History of Olympic Games - please select

Athens 1896

Games of the I Olympiad were held from 6 to 15 April, 1896 in Athens, Greece.

The decision for the first modern Olympic Games to be held in Athens in 1896 was adopted at the founding Congress of the International Olympic Committee in 1894. Even though Greece had no experience in organizing such  large competitions and the financial resources were relatively limited, the Olympics were organized successfully. At that time, the concept of National Olympic Teams differed from today. The athletes mostly represented themselves or their own clubs, while the information about the National Olympic Team was only mentioned in passing. Athletes from 14 countries participated at the Games and according to the applications it can be concluded that these countries were Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States.

The iconic Olympic rings symbol was not designed by Baron Pierre de Coubertin  until 1912.

Nine bands and 150 choir singers performed an Olympic Hymn, composed by Spyridon Samaras, with words by poet Kostis Palamas. Thereafter, a variety of musical offerings provided the backgrounds to the Opening Ceremonies until 1960, since which time the Samaras/Palamas composition has become the official Olympic Anthem (decision taken by the IOC Session in 1958). Other elements of current Olympic opening ceremonies were initiated later: the Olympic flame was first lit in 1928, the first athletes' oath took place at the 1920 Summer Olympics and the first officials' oath was taken at the 1972 Olympic Games.

There were 241 athletes from 14 countries participating in 10 sports disciplines.

The Olympic program included Athletics, Cycling, Fencing, Shooting, Gymnastics, Swimming, Tennis, Weightlifting and Wrestling.

The Athens Olympics were held exclusively for the male teams, but there is a record of a girl named Stamata Revithi nicknamed Melpomene, (after the Greek muse of tragedy) who, out of protest that women were not allowed to perform at the Olympics, ran the Marathon Race on 11 April, one day after their marathon race was run by men.

The winners were then rewarded with a medal made of silver and an olive-tree wreath. Runners-up received a copper medal. Retroactively, the IOC has converted these to gold and silver, and awarded bronze medals to third placed athletes.

Paris 1900

Games of the II Olympiad were held from May 14 to October 28, 1900 in Paris, France.

Contrary to Greeks' expectations that the Olympics will continue being held solely in their homeland, the Paris Olympics were held as an accompanying event of the World Fair, and they were characterized by two details: they lasted almost 5 and a half months and women were allowed to participate at them.

These Olympic Games were the first organized under the IOC Presidency of Pierre de Coubertin.

Gold medals were not given at the 1900 Games. A silver medal was given for the first place and a bronze medal for the second. The International Olympic Committee has retrospectively assigned gold, silver, and bronze medals to competitors who earned 1st  2nd and 3rd place in order to bring early Olympics in line with current awards.

There were 997 athletes from 24 countries competing in 20 sports disciplines.

Compared to the Athens Olympics, the program did not include Weightlifting and Wrestling, but 13 new sports disciplines were added. Thus, the Olympians competed in Paris in Athletics, Cycling, Sailing, Equestrian, Cricket, Croquet, Shooting, Archery, Gymnastics, Fencing, Football, Swimming, Tennis, Golf, Polo, Tug of War, Basque Pelota, Rugby, Water Polo and Rowing.

Women took part in the Games for the first time and sailor Hélène de Pourtalès, born Helen Barbey in New York City, became the first female Olympic champion.

The competitions in coxed pairs with coxswain and coxed eights replaced adult coxswain with children! The age and identity of those boys are not recorded, so one can only speculate that they were the youngest Olympians in the history of the Olympic Games.

Some events were contested for the only time in the history of the Games, including Automobile and Motorcycle Racing, Ballooning, Cricket, Croquet, Basque Pelota, 200m Swimming Obstacle Race and Underwater Swimming.

Most of the winners in 1900 did not receive medals, but cups or trophies. Professionals competed in fencing and Albert Robert Ayat (France) was awarded a prize of 3000 francs

There was also the first Croatian athlete participating at the Paris Olympics 1900 - swordsman  Milan Neralić, who also became the first Croatian medal winner (at the Olympic Games. He competed for Austria (because Croatia was part of Austro-Hungarian Empire at that time) and he was one of the best swordsmen in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and also a fencing teacher. Neralić was the first in the history to apply a "flying lunge", thrusting of opponent from a high jump. At the Paris Olympics, he won a bronze medal in Master’s Sabre.

Croatian athletes in Paris - 1

Fencing (1) - Milan Neralić

Medal winners:

Bronze - Milan Neralić (Master’s Sabre, Singles)

St. Louis 1904

Games of the III Olympiad were held from July 1 to November 23, 1904 in St. Louis, USA.

Although initially the International Olympic Committee selected Chicago as the host city, the event was later moved to St. Louis. Similar to the previous Olympics in Paris, these Olympics were held over several months, as an accompanying event of the World Fair. Even sports competitions were held simultaneously with many other competitions, but they differed from them because they were marked with the “Olympic” label. These were the first Olympics that featured the official presentation of all three medals (gold, silver, bronze).

There were 651 athletes from 12 countries competing in 17 sports disciplines.

Boxing, Dumbbells, Freestyle Wrestling and Decathlon made their debuts.

Basketball, Hurling, American Football and Baseball were featured as Demonstration Sports. Gaelic Football was also an unofficial Demonstration Sports at the 1904 Olympics.

Water Polo is also mentioned in the Games’ reports for the 1904 Summer Olympics. However, it was not considered at the time to be a Demonstration Sports and, even though it has since been classified as such, it has not been included retrospectively in the IOC's official medal database.

After these Olympics, the Greeks demanded the future Games to be organized in Greece only, so they even organized the "Intercalated Games" in 1906 to give the Olympic Games back their dignity and true sense.

London 1908

Games of the IV Olympiad were held from April 27 to October 31, 1908 in London, UK

The International Olympic Committee originally selected Rome as a host city, but following the eruption of the volcano Vesuvius in 1906 during which Naples was nearly destroyed, the Italian government decided to reallocate the funds foreseen for the organization of the Olympics and use them for reconstruction and help to the city. For that reason, the Olympics were moved to London.

While these Olympics were considered to be the fifth in a row, it was subsequently decided that the Olympic Intercalated Games held two years earlier in Athens shall be erased from the official list of the Olympic Games and since then the Games were regularly held exclusively in a four-year-cycle. Today, the London Olympics are called the Fourth Olympic Games.

Lasting a total of 187 days, or 6 months and 4 days, these Games were the longest in modern Olympics history.

These Olympics followed the tradition of Opening Ceremony, with the parade of competitors that was first held two years earlier in Athens. This tradition continued until the present day, although there have been a lot of controversies over the London Olympics.

These Games have shown the importance of establishing common judicial rules and judicial staff consisting of judges from different countries, and not just from the host country, as was the case until then.

There were 2,008 athletes from 22 countries competing in 25 sports disciplines.

These Games were the first to include winter events, as had originally been proposed for the Games – i.e. a traditional winter sport - Figure Skating. There were four figure skating events, although held on October 28 and 29, months after most of the other events.

Stockholm 1912

Games of the V Olympiad were held from July 6 to 22, 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden.

For the first time, the competitors from all five continents participated at the Games, having thus the symbol of the Olympic five circles confirmed to the full extent. At the Stockholm Olympics, the winners were presented solid gold medals for the last time. After these Games, it became a practice to have the gold medals made of gold-plated silver or bronze.

There were 2,407 athletes from 28 countries competing in 18 sports disciplines.

These were the first Olympics that included a competition in art (Literature, Sculpture, Painting, Architecture and Music with medals awarded for works of art inspired by sports) and both Women’s Swimming and Diving. It is interesting that the Olympic gold in Literature was won by Baron Pierre de Coubertin, President of the International Olympic Committee who applied for a competition under the pseudonym. Art competitions formed part of the modern Olympic Games during its early years, from 1912 to 1948.

In the evening of 7 July, the following Demonstration Sports took place: Pärk - a type of tennis with seven players a side, Glima - a type of Icelandic wrestling, Swedish sports Varpa - similar to quoits, Stångstörtning - a version of caber toss and Baseball.

At these Games, the athletic program included both Decathlon and Pentathlon.

Berlin 1916

Games of the VI Olympiad in Berlin 1916 were not held due to the World War I.

Olympic Games - Antwerpen 1920

Games of the VII Olympiad were held from April 20 to September 12, 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium.

The decision on the host city was adopted at the IOC Congress in 1919 and the remaining two candidates were Amsterdam and Lyon.

For the first time, the Olympic oath was spoken at these Olympics which, since then, has been pronounced by one athlete on behalf of the team at each of the Games as selected by the host.

These Olympics were the first in which the Olympic Oath was voiced, the first in which doves were released to symbolize peace, and the first in which the Olympic Flag was flown.

There were 2,626 athletes from 29 countries competing in 29 sports disciplines.

For the first time since the London Olympics 1908, the program included winter sports as well, at these Games Figure Skating and Ice Hockey and Korfball was a Demonstration Sports.

Croatian athletes in Antwerp - 10

Football (10) - Dragutin Vrđuka, Vjekoslav Župančić, Jaroslav Šifer, Slavin Cindrić, Rudolf Rupec, Dragutin Vragović, Artur Dubravčić, Emil Perška, Ivan Granec, Josip Scholz.

OIympic Games - Paris 1924

Games of the VIII Olympiad were held from the May 4 to July 27, 1924 in Paris, France.

The International Olympic Committee selected Paris in the competition with Amsterdam, Berlin, Los Angeles, Rio de Janeiro and Rome. These were the last Olympics during which the President of the IOC was Pierre de Coubertin. As an accompanying event, the International Winter Sports Week was held in Chamonix from January 25 to February 5, proclaimed later by the IOC the I Olympic Winter Games.

In terms of these Games’ particularities, it should be noted that a selected Marathon distance of 42 km and 195 m, the same as the one at London Olympics in 1908,  became a standard length of all the marathons since Paris Olympics.

The Olympic motto Citius, Altius, Fortius (Faster, Higher, Stronger) was used for the first time at the Olympics. These were the first Games to feature an Olympic Village. The last surviving competitor of the 1924 Summer Olympics was Croatian swimmer Ivo Pavelić, who died on February 22, 2011 at the age of 103.

There were 3,089 athletes from 44 countries competing in 23 sports disciplines.

At these Games, the Demonstration Sports were Basque Pelota, Canoeing, Jeu de Paume, Savate, Volleyball and Baseball.

The 1924 Olympics were the first to use the standard 50 m pool with marked lanes.

Croatian athletes in Paris - 36

Athletics (3) - Veljko Narančić, Peroslav Ferković, Đuro Gašpar

Cycling (3) - Đuro Dukanović, Koloman Sović, Rudolf Truban

Football (19) - Dragutin Vrđuka, Stjepan Vrbančić, Eugen Dasović, Ivan Marjanović, Rudolf Rupec, Janko Rodin, Dragutin Babić, Emil Perška, Vladimir Vinek, Eugen Plazzeriano, Stjepan Bocak, Slavin Cindrić, Artur Dubravčić, Dragutin Friedrich, Antun Pavleković, Alfons Pažur, Dragutin Vragović, Branko Zinaja, Rudolf Percl

Swimming (5) - Vladimir Smokvina, Atilio Venturini, Ante Roja, Ivan Pavelić, Ivan Arčanin

Rowing (6) - Ante Katalinić, Frane Katalinić, Šimun Katalinić, Petar Ivanov, Bruno Sorić, Viktor Ljubić (Zadar rowers who then performed for Italy)

Medal winners:

Bronze - Ante Katalinić, Frane Katalinić, Šimun Katalinić, Petar Ivanov, Bruno Sorić, Viktor Ljubić (Rowing, Coxed Eight)

Winter Olympic Games - Chamonix 1924

The I Olympic Winter Games were held from January 25 to February 5, 1924 in Chamonix, France.

These Olympics were initially known as the International Winter Sports Week (Semaine des Sports d'Hiver) and were held as part of the Paris Olympic Games 1924. Namely, even though Figure Skating was present at the London and Antwerp Olympics and Ice Hockey in Antwerp, winter sports were still depending on the season. In 1921, at the International Olympic Committee’s meeting in Lausanne, it was decided to have the International Winter Sports Week organized in 1924 in Chamonix. Already in 1925, the IOC decided to organize the Winter Olympics every four years, regardless of the Summer Olympics, and the International Winter Sports Week was named the Olympic Winter Games.

The tradition of holding the Winter Olympics in the same year as the Summer Olympics would continue until 1992, and thereafter the current practice of holding the Winter Olympics in the second year after each Summer Olympics began.

In Chamonix, there were 258 athletes from 16 countries competing in nine sports disciplines.

The forerunner of modern Biathlon – Military Patrol – was included in these Games’ program, as well as Curling.

At the closing of the Games a prize was awarded for a sport that did not lend itself very well for tournaments: Pierre de Coubertin presented a prize for “alpinism” (mountaineering) to Charles Granville Bruce, the leader of the expedition that tried to climb Mount Everest in 1922.

There were two Croatian athletes participating in Chamonix. Dušan Zinaja and Miroslav Pandaković competed under the flag of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes in Cross-Country Skiing, in 18 and 50 km races of 18 and 50 km. Pandaković did not finish both races, while Zinaja took the 36th place in the 18 km race and finished the 50 km race after the judges stopped counting the time.

Croatian athletes in Chamonix-2

Cross-Country Skiing (2) - Dušan Zinaja, Miroslav Pandaković

OIympic Games - Amsterdam 1928

Games of the IX Olympiad were held from July 28 to August 12, 1928 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Amsterdam was also among the candidates for hosting city of the Olympics held in 1920 and 1924 but succeeded yet in the third attempt. These were the first Olympics where the Olympic Flame was lit during the Games, although the Olympic Torch Relay was introduced later, at the Berlin Olympics 1936. In addition to the Olympic Flame, for the first time the athletes' parade was performed in such a way that Greek athletes were the first, followed by the athletes from other countries in the country's alphabet order and as the last ones were the representatives of the host country. This arrangement of athletes in the parade remained common to the present day.

These Games were the first to feature a fixed schedule of sixteen days, which is still followed. In previous Olympics, competition had been stretched out over several months.

There were 2883 athletes from 46 countries competing in 20 sports disciplines.

These Olympics introduced disciplines for women in Athletics and Gymnastics. After the 800 m race for women, in which several female athletes finished the race completely exhausted, it was concluded that women are not strong enough to withstand the efforts of long athletic races. Therefore, until the 60’s of the 20th century the program of competitions for women included only racing disciplines of up to 200 meters.

Athletics events were held on a 400-meter track, later becoming the standard for athletics tracks.

Tennis disappeared from the program and returned in 1968 as a Demonstrations Sports.

For the first time, the organization of the Games was supported also by sponsorships of large companies such as Coca-Cola. It is interesting that this fact did not change the IOC’s opinion on the necessity of complete amateurism of athletes, so they were not allowed to have any commercial contract for many years on if they wanted to perform at the Olympics.

Croatian athletes in Amsterdam - 7

Athletics (3) - Franjo Predanić, Vilim Mesner, Branko Kallay

Cycling (3) - Stjepan Ljubić, Antun Banek, Josip Škrabl

Gymnastics (1) - Dragutin Ciotti

Medal winners:

Bronze - Dragutin Ciotti (Gymnastics, team competition)

Winter Olympic Games - St. Moritz 1928

The II Olympic Winter Games were held from February 11 to 19, 1928 in St. Moritz, Switzerland.

St. Moritz Olympics were the first true Winter Olympics held on its own and not as part of the Summer Olympics, as the previous Winter Olympic Games.

These Games replaced the now redundant Nordic Games, held quadrennially since early in the century.

There were 464 athletes from 25 countries competing in eight sports disciplines.

Demonstration Sports at these Games were Military Patrol and Skijoring (a person on skis is pulled by dogs, horses or a form of mechanized transportation such as a snowmobile; at these Olympics – by horses).

Winter Olympic Games - Lake Placid 1932

The III Olympic Winter Games were held from February 4 to 15, 1932 in Lake Placid, USA.

The Olympics were originally planned to be held in Big Pines, California, but due to the bad situation with weather and lack of snow they were moved to Lake Placid.

There were 252 athletes from 17 countries competing in seven sports disciplines.

These Games included events in three Demonstration Sports – Curling, Sled Dog Race and Speed Skating for women.

OIympic Games - Los Angeles 1932

Games of the X Olympiad were held from July 30 to August 14, 1932 in Los Angeles, USA.

As these Olympics were held in times of great economic crisis, besides Los Angeles there were no other cities for the host candidate. Furthermore, for financial reasons many countries had to give up sending many athletes or did not participate at the Olympics at all, so compared to the previous Games the number of competitors was twice as small.

For the first time, the Olympic Village was built for the purpose of accommodation of athletes, later used for the needs of the host city university.

The winning pedestal was used for the first time.

There were 1,332 athletes from 37 countries competing in 20 sports disciplines.

At these Olympics, the Demonstration Sports were American Football and Lacrosse.

Croatian athletes in Los Angeles - 1

Athletics (1) - Veljko Narančić

OIympic Games - Berlin 1936

Games of the XI Olympiad were held from August 1 to 16, 1936 in Berlin, Germany.

The candidate for these Games’ host city was also Barcelona.

At these Olympics, the Olympic Torch was carried - for the first time - by athletes from Greece to the Olympic Stadium in Berlin. The Olympic Torch Relay has since become a common practice at all the Olympic Games. Those were the first TV live-broadcasted Olympics. As there were virtually no privately-owned TV-sets at the time, the viewers could follow the Games on the screens set up throughout Berlin.

The famous filmmaker Leni Riefstahl filmed the relay for the 1938 movie Olympia.

These ames had the largest and heaviest medals ever awarded to athletes: 100 mm (3.9 in) diameter, 4 mm (0.16 in) thick, weighing 324 g (11.4 oz).

There were 3,963 athletes from 49 countries competing in 25 sports disciplines.

Basketball and Handball also made their debut at the Olympics, both as outdoor sports.

Demonstrations Sports were Art, Baseball, Gliding and Wushu.

Croatian athletes in Berlin - 54

Athletics (12) - Ivan Ivanović, Ivo Buratović, Joakim Bakov, Rudolf Markušić, Veljko Narančić, Aleksa Kovačević, Petar Goić, Nikola Kleut, Ivan Valent, Vera Romanić, Zulejka Stefanini, Vjera Neferović

Cycling (2) - August Prosenik, Josip Pokupec

Wrestling (2) - Tomislav Šestak, Antun Fischer

Sailing (1) - Karlo Bauman

Kayak (2) - Mirko Vincens, Josip Zidarn

Fencing (6) - Vladimir Mažuranić, Branimir Tretinjak, Krešimir Tretinjak, Pavao Pintarić, Milivoj Radović

Swimming (2) - Tonko Gazzari, Zmaj Defilipis

Water Polo (10) - Filip Bonačić, Luka Ciganović, Vinko Cvjetković, Milivoj Čurlica, Ivo Giovanelli, Miro Mihovilović, Vojko Pavičić, Ante Roje, Mirko Tarana, Bogdan Tošović

Rowing (17) - Davor Jelaska, Jakov Tironi, Emanuel Mrduljaš, Ivo Fabris, Lino Pavao Ljubičić, Vid Fašaić, Drago Matulaj, Stipe Krnčević, Rade Sunara, Vice Jurišić, Ćiril Ban, Leonardo Bujas, Marijan Zaninović, Ante Krnčević, Špiro Grubišić, Nikša Alegretti, Milan Blaće

Winter Olympic Games - Garmisch-Partenkirchen 1936

The IV Olympic Winter Games were held from February 6 to 16, 1936 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

In the same year, Germany hosted the Summer Olympics in Berlin.

There were 646 athletes from 28 countries competing in eight sports disciplines.

For the first time, the program of the Games included Alpine Skiing as the Combined, which added a skier's results in both Downhill and Slalom.

Demonstration Sports were Military Patrol and Ice Stock Sport.

Olympic Games - Tokyo 1940

Games of the XII Olympiad were supposed to be held from September 21 to October 6, 1940 in  Tokyo, Japan.

However, due to the beginning of II Chinese-Japanese war in 1937, the International Olympic Committee took the Games from Tokyo and awarded them to Helsinki, which was a second-placed city in the hosting city competition. Due to the beginning of the World War II, the Olympics were eventually cancelled.

Helsinki later hosted the 1952 Olympics and Tokyo organized the 1964 Olympics.

Had these Summer Olympics been held, a never-before used method of bringing the Olympic Flame from Germany to Japan was proposed – by air, in the purpose-built Messerschmitt ME 261, designed to have a maximum range of some 11,024 km unrefueled.

Olympic Games - London 1944

Games of the XIII Olympiad were not held due to the World War II.

If the Games would have been held, they would take place in London, which later hosted the 1948 Olympics.

In spite of the war, the IOC organized many events to celebrate the 15th anniversary of its foundation at its headquarters in Lausanne. Held from June 17 to 19, 1944, this celebration was referred as to “The Jubilee Celebrations of the IOC” by Carl Diem, the originator of the modern tradition of Olympic Torch Relay.

Olympic Games - St. Moritz 1948

The V Olympic Winter Games were held from January 30 to February 8, 1948 in St. Moritz, Switzerland.

These were the second Olympics in that city, after the 1928 Olympics. The Winter Olympics in St. Moritz were held after a full 12-year break, caused by the World War II.  

There were 669 athletes from 28 countries competing in nine sports disciplines.

The program included Skeleton, a sport that will next appear at the Winter Olympics yet in Salt Lake City in 2002.

These Olympics also featured two Demonstration Sports – Military Patrol and Winter Pentathlon (discontinued after these Games).

Olympic Games - London 1948

Games of the XIV Olympiad were held from July 29 to August 14, 1948 in London, UK.

These were the first Games after Berlin Olympics 1936 and a break of 12 years caused by the World War II.

Olympic pictograms were introduced for the first time. There were 20 of them - one for each Olympic sport and three separate pictograms for the arts competition, the Opening Ceremony and the Closing Ceremony. They were called "Olympic symbols" and intended for use on tickets. The background of each pictogram resembled an escutcheon. Olympic pictograms appeared again 16 years later and were used at all subsequent Summer Olympics.

These Olympics were the last to include Arts competition.

There were 4,014 athletes from 59 countries competing in 23 sports disciplines.

For the first time, the custom of awarding Olympic diplomas for the six first-ranked contestants or teams in every discipline was introduced.
These Olympics also included Lacrosse as Demonstration Sports.

Croatian athletes in London - 53

Athletics (6) - Ivan Gubijan, Zvonimir Sabolović, Petar Šegedin, Jerko Bulić, Davorin Marčelja, Alma Butia
Cycling (3) - Milan Poredski, August Prosenik, Antun Strain
Gymnastics (6) - Dragutin Jelić, Ivan Jelić, Stjepan Boltižar, Tanja Kober, Dragica Basletić, Zlata Mijatović
Football (11) - Stjepan Bobek, Božo Broketa, Zvonimir Cimermančić, Zlatko Čajkovski, Zeljko Čajkovski, Ivan Jazbinšek, Ratko Kacijan, Frane Matošić, Franjo Šoštarić, Bernard Vukas, Franjo Wölfl
Swimming (4) - Marijan Stipetić, Branko Vidović, Ivan Puhar, Vanja Ilić
Water Polo (11) - Juraj Amšel, Veljko Bakašun, Marko Brajnović, Luka Ciganović, Ivo Giovanelli, Božo Grkinić, Zdravko Kovačić, Ivan Kurtini, Željko Radić, Aleksandar Strmac, Ivo Štakula

Rowing (12) - Marko Horvatin, Petar Ozretić, Ivo Lipanović, Mate Mojtić, Klement Alujević, Šime Bujas, Stipe Krnčević, Jakiša Labura, Daniel Krnčević, Branko Becić, Ivan Telismanić, Karlo Pavlenč

Medal winners:

Silver - Ivan Gubijan (Athletics, Hammer Throw)
Silver - Stjepan Bobek, Božo Broketa, Zvonimir Cimermančić, Zlatko Čajkovski, Željko Čajkovski, Ivan Jazbinšek, Ratko Kacijan, Frane Matošić, Franjo Šoštarić, Bernard Vukas, Franjo Wölfl (National Olympic Football Team)

Winter Olympic Games - Oslo 1952

The VI Olympic Winter Games were held from February 14 to 25, 1952 in Oslo, Norway.

These were the first Winter Olympics in Scandinavia, the cradle of modern winter sports and the first Winter Olympics held in the capital of a country. Italian Cortina D'Ampezzo and the American Lake Placid were competing for the organization of these Games as well.

There were 694 athletes from 30 countries competing in eight sports disciplines.

The program of the Games included, for the first time, Cross-Country Skiing for women.

These Games featured one Demonstration Sports – Bandy (team winter sports played on ice).

Croatian athletes in Oslo - 1

Cross-country Skiing (1) - Nada Birko-Kustec

Winter Olympic Games - Cortina d'Ampezzo 1956

The VII Olympic Winter Games were held from January 26 to February 5, 1956 in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy.

The International Olympic Committee awarded the Olympics to Cortina in the competition with Colorado Springs, Lake Placid and Montreal.

These Olympics featured the largest number of participating countries at the Winter Olympics until then.

The Olympic oath was delivered by Giuliana Chenal-Minuzzo; this was the first time a female athlete gave the oath at an Olympic Games.

The Olympic Hymn, officially recognized as such at the IOC Congress in Paris in 1955, was played for the first time at the Cortina Olympics.

There were 824 athletes from 32 countries competing in eight sports disciplines.

At these Games, two new events were added – Men’s 30 km Cross-Country Ski Race and Women’s 3x5 km Cross-Country Relay Race.

Croatian athletes in Cortina d'Ampezzo - 2

Cross-Country Skiing (2) - Nada Birko-Kustec, Blaženka Vodenlić

Olympic Games - Helsinki 1952

Games of the XV Olympiad were held from July 19 to August 3, 1952 in Helsinki, Finland.

Helsinki was selected to host the Olympics in the competition with Amsterdam, Athens, Lausanne, Stockholm, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles and Philadelphia. Helsinki was already designated to host the 1940 Olympics, but they were cancelled due to the World War II.

There were 4,955 athletes from 69 countries competing in 23 sports disciplines.

At these Olympics, most world records were broken until surpassed by the Beijing Olympics in 2008.

Helsinki Olympics featured two Demonstration Sports – Handball and Pesäpallo (Finnish variant of baseball).

Croatian athletes in Helsinki - 61

Athletics (9) - Andrija Otenheimer, Zlatko Ceraj, Franjo Mihalić, Franjo Krajcar, Drago Štritof, Petar Šegedin, Ivan Gubijan, Rudolf Galin, Milan Milakov

Boxing (1) - Tomislav Krizmanić

Gymnastics (7) - Dušan Furlan, Ede Mađar, Ivan Jelić, Ivan Čaklec, Franjo Jurjević, Antun Kropivšek, Tanja Kober

Sailing (5) - Mario Fafangel, Karlo Bašić, Karlo Bauman, Tito Barač, Ante Bui

Football (10) - Vladimir Beara, Stjepan Bobek, Tomislav Crnković, Zlatko Čajkovski, Ivica Horvat, Bernard Vukas, Branko Zebec, Vladimir Čonč, Vladimir Firm, Slavko Luštica

Swimming (3) - Boris Škanata, Nikola Trojanovic, Blago Barbieri

Shooting (3) - Rudolf Vuk, Zlatko Mašek, Stjepan Prauhardt

Water Polo (10) - Juraj Amšel, Zdravko Kovačić, Veljko Bakašun, Ivo Štakula, Ivan Kurtini, Zdravko Ježić, Vladimir Ivković, Lovro Radonić, Marko Brajnović, Boško Vuksanović

Rowing (13) - Duje Bonačić, Velimir Valenta, Mate Trojanović, Petar Šegvić, Stanko Despot, Karlo Pavlenč, Dragutin Husjak, Branko Belačić, Ladislav Matečić, Boris Beljak, Vojko Šeravić, Vladimir Horvat, Zdenko Bego

Medal winners:

Gold - Duje Bonačić, Velimir Valenta, Mate Trojanović, Petar Šegvić (Rowing, Coxless Four)

Silver - Vladimir Beara, Stjepan Bobek, Tomislav Crnković, Zlatko Čajkovski, Ivica Horvat, Bernard Vukas, Branko Zebec, Vladimir Čonč, Vladimir Firm, Slavko Luštica (National Olympic Football Team)

Silver - Juraj Amšel, Zdravko Kovačić, Veljko Bakašun, Ivo Štakula, Ivan Kurtini, Zdravko Ježić, Vladimir Ivković, Lovro Radonić, Marko Brajnović, Boško Vuksanović (National Olympic Water Polo Team)

Olympic Games - Melbourne 1956

Games of the XVI Olympiad were held from November 22 to December 8, 1956 in Melbourne, Australia.

The International Olympic Committee decided to award hosting, for the first time, to a city in the southern hemisphere of the Earth, in the competition with Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Montreal and six other cities from the United States.

Many members of the IOC had a lot of doubts about the selected city because the competitions had to take place during the part of the year when the weather in the southern hemisphere was perfect. This, of course, was not in favor of most competitors who came mostly from the northern hemisphere countries, since they had to adapt preparations to achieve the best form in - for them - unusual period of the year. In addition, due to the rules of quarantine in Australia it was not possible to transport horses for competing in Equestrian, so it was held in Stockholm, Sweden, five months later.

The enduring tradition of National Teams parading as one during the Closing Ceremony was started at these Olympics.

Athletes from both East and West Germany competed together as Unified Team, a remarkable display of unity that was repeated in 1960 and 1964 but was then discontinued.

There were 3,314 athletes from 72 countries competing in 23 sports disciplines.

These Olympics included two Demonstration Sports – Australian Football and Baseball.

Croatian athletes in Melbourne - 21

Athletics (2) - Franjo Mihalić, Krešimir Račić

Football (6) - Mladen Koščak, Ivan Šantek, Zlatko Papec, Nikola Radović, Luka Lipošinović, Joško Vidošević

Swimming (1) - Vinka Jeričević

Shooting (1) - Zlatko Mašek

Water Polo (10) - Juraj Amšel, Zdravko Kovačić, Ivo Cipci, Hrvoje Kačić, Marijan Žuželj, Zdravko Ježić, Lovro Radonić, Tomislav Franjković, Vladimir Ivković, Ivo Štakula

Rowing (1) - Perica Vlašić

Medal winners:

Silver - Franjo Mihalić (Athletics, Marathon)

Silver - Mladen Koščak, Ivan Šantek, Zlatko Papec, Nikola Radović, Luka Lipošinović, Joško Vidošević (National Olympic Football Team)

Silver - Juraj Amšel, Zdravko Kovačić, Ivo Cipci, Hrvoje Kačić, Marijan Žuželj, Zdravko Ježić, Lovro Radonić, Tomislav Franjković, Vladimir Ivković, Ivo Štakula (National Olympic Water Polo Team)

Winter Olympic Games - Squaw Walley 1960

The VIII Olympic Winter Games were held from February 18 to 28, 1960 in Squaw Valley, USA.

There were no bobsleigh tracks among sports venues, so these were the only Olympics in the history not having Bobsleigh included in the program.

There were several design innovations and new technologies used for the Squaw Valley Olympics. Speed Skating, Figure Skating and Ice Hockey events were held on artificial ice for the first time in the Olympic history. New timing equipment provided by Longines was installed for measuring the hundredths of a second by using the quartz clock. IBM provided a computer that was capable for tabulating results and printing them in English and French. Blyth Arena, site of Opening and Closing Ceremony, as well as Figure Skating and Ice Hockey competitions had a 56 cm gap in the roof that would slide closed as the cables supporting the roof contracted during cold weather.  

There were 665 athletes from 30 countries competing in eight sports disciplines.

The program of the Games included Biathlon and Speed Skating for women.

After the Olympics, the hosts decided to preserve the Olympic Flame, which is still burning in Squaw Valley today.

Olympic Games - Rome 1960

Games of the XVII Olympiad were held from August 25 to September 11, 1960 in Rome, Italy.

Rome was previously selected to host the 1908 Olympics, but then the Italian government - due to the eruption of the volcano Vesuvius in 1906 - decided to step off from the organization, resulting in those Games being moved to London. The International Olympic Committee selected Rome to host the 1960 Olympics in the competition with Lausanne, Detroit, Budapest, Brussels, Mexico City and Tokyo.

Rome Olympics were the first Games the global development and spreading of television helped in promoting and broadcasting the competition. It has been reported that over 100 TV channels in Europe, the USA, Canada and Japan broadcasted the Olympics, resulting in tremendous interest in the Games.

There were 5,338 athletes from 83 countries competing in 23 sports disciplines.

Croatian athletes in Rome - 50

Athletics (6) - Franjo Škrinjar, Franjo Mihalić, Đani Kovač, Viktor Šnajder, Antun Bezjak, Krešimir Račić

Cycling (2) - Ivan Levačić, Nevio Valčić

Boxing (1) - Obrad Sretenović

Gymnastics (3) - Alojz Petrović, Ivan Čaklec, Marcel Markulin

Sailing (2) - Ante Pivčević, Mario Fafangel

Basketball (2) - Giuseppe Giergia, Zvonimir Petričević

Football (6) - Željko Perušić, Ante Žanetić, Andrija Anković, Aleksandra Kozlina, Željko Matuš, Zvonko Bego

Swimming (5) - Gojko Arneri, Veljko Rogošić, Milan Jeger, Mihovil Dorčić, Lovro Radonić

Shooting (1) - Josip Ćuk

Water Polo (8) - Gojko Arneri, Ivica Cipci, Zdravko Ježić, Hrvoje Kačić, Antun Nardelli, Lovro Radonić, Zlatko Šimenc, Marijan Žužej

Rowing (13) - Perica Vlašić, Jože Lovec, Anton Ivanković, Nikola Čupin, Antun Vrčić, Paško Škarica, Josip Bujas, Janez Pintar, Vladimir Nekora, Vjekoslav Skalak, Igor Radin, Nikola Stipaničev, Adolf Potokar

Medal winners:

Gold - Željko Perušić, Ante Žanetić, Andrija Anković, Aleksandra Kozlina, Željko Matuš, Zvonko Bego (National Olympic Football Team)

Winter Olympic Games - Innsbruck 1964

The IX Olympic Winter Games were held from January 29 to February 9, 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria.

The organizers had a major difficulty in preparing the Olympics due to the lack of snow. The army was summoned to help and drag from the higher parts of the mountain 20,000 ice blocks for the bobsleigh track and 40,000 cubic meters of snow for ski courses.

These were the first Winter Olympics for which the Olympic Flame was lit in Greece, in ancient Olympia, which became a practice for all the future Winter Olympics.

For the first time the Closing Ceremony was held at a different place than the Opening Ceremony.

Italian Eugenio Monti observed that a rival team in the two-person bobsleigh from Great Britain had broken a part of their sled and lent them a necessary replacement part. The British later won a gold medal and Monti with the Italian team a bronze one. When the press asked Monty why he helped a direct competitor, he replied that the British didn't win because he lent them the replacement part, but because they rode the track the fastest. The International Olympic Committee subsequently introduced the Pierre De Coubertin Award for Fair Play and the first awardee was Monti.

There were 1,091 athletes from 36 countries competing in 10 sports disciplines.

Luge made its Olympic debut at these Games.

These Olympics featured one Demonstration Sports - Ice Stock.

Croatian athletes in Innsbruck-3

Ice Hockey (3) - Miran Krmelj, Ivan Ratej, Boris Renaud

Olympic Games - Tokyo 1964

Games of the XVIII Olympiad were held from October 10 to 24, 1964 in Tokyo, Japan.

The International Olympic Committee selected Tokyo in the competition with Detroit, Buenos Aires and Vienna. Tokyo was already selected to host the Olympic Games in 1940 but - due to the beginning of II. Chinese-Japanese war in 1937 - the IOC took the Games from Tokyo and assigned them to Helsinki. Later, for the beginning of II. World War II and games completely postponed. Tokyo Olympics were the first Olympic Games in the history held in Asia.

At the Opening Ceremony, the Olympic Flame at the stadium was lit by Yashinori Sakai, a young man born in Hiroshima on August 6 1945, the day the atomic bomb fell on that city.

There were 5,151 athletes from 93 countries competing in 25 sports disciplines.

The program of the Games included two sports that were popular in Japan: Judo and Volleyball.

These Olympics included two Demonstration Sports – Baseball and Budō (including demonstration of Kyudo, Kendo and Sumo, while Judo – also a Budō – was part of the regular program).

Women's Pentathlon (Shot Put, High Jump, Hurdling, Sprint and Long Jump) was introduced to the Athletics events.

Croatian athletes in Tokyo - 29

Athletics (1) - Đani Kovač

Gymnastics (3) - Alojz Petrović, Ivan Čaklec, Nenad Vidović

Basketball (3) - Giuseppe Giergia, Dragutin Kovačić, Zvonimir Petričević

Football (5) - Rudolf Belin, Marijan Brnić, Milan Čop, Zlatko Škorić, Slaven Zambata

Swimming (2) - Slobodan Dijaković, Veljko Rogošić

Water Polo (7) - Ivan Trumbić, Vinko Rosić, Zlatko Šimenc, Anton Nardelli, Ozren Bonačić, Frane Nonković, Karlo Stipanić

Rowing (8) - Slavko Janušević, Ante Guberina, Zdenko Balaš, Vjekoslav Skalak, Marko Mandić, Lucijan Kleva, Pavao Martić, Frane Kazija

Medal winners:

Silver - Ivan Trumbić, Vinko Rosić, Zlatko Šimenc, Anton Nardelli, Ozren Bonačić, Frane Nonković, Karlo Stipanić (National Olympic Water Polo Team)

Winter Olympic Games - Grenoble 1968

The X Olympic Winter Games were held from February 6 to 18, 1968 in Grenoble, France.

For the first time, the International Olympic Committee allowed East and West Germany to appear as completely separate teams, even though they were performing at these Olympics as Unified German Team. This practice of separate performances will continue until the reunion of in Germany 1990.

The International Olympic Committee introduced - for the first time - doping and sex controls at the Olympics.

Grenoble 1968 is the first Olympiad to adopt a mascot, although unofficially. Schuss, the mascot, is a styled skier.

There were 1,158 athletes from 37 countries competing in 10 sports disciplines.

Croatian athletes in Grenoble - 2

Ice Hockey (2) - Ivan Ratej, Boris Renaud

Olympic Games - Mexico City 1968

Games of the XIX Olympiad were held from October 12 to 27, 1968 in Mexico City, Mexico.

The International Olympic Committee selected this city in the competition with Detroit, Buenos Aires and Lyon. At the opening of the Games, the honor of lighting the Olympic Flame was awarded - for the first time - to a woman, the Mexican athlete Norma Enriqueta Basilio de Sotelo.

Doping controls for athletes were introduced for the first time at the Summer Olympics.

These were the first Olympics to use an all-weather (smooth) track for track and field events instead of the traditional cinder track.

At these Games, the Closing Ceremony as well as the events were broadcasted in color to the world for the first time. 

There were 5,516 athletes from 112 countries competing in 24 sports disciplines.

As the host city was at a high altitude (2,240 MASL) in many endurance sports the competitors had difficulty adapting to the conditions of the rare air. For some sports, the rare air favored them in achieving good results, most noticeable in sprint and jumping athletic disciplines.

The biggest sensation of swimming competitions was attained by Split native Đurđica Bjedov, who came to Mexico to fill the relay and won gold in Women’s 100 m Breaststroke and silver in Women’s 200 m Breaststroke.

These Games included two Demonstration Sports – Basque Pelota and Tennis.

These were the last Olympics to have Judo not included in the program.

Croatian athletes in Mexico - 25

Athletics (2) - Nediljko Farčić, Đurđa Fočić

Cycling (1) - Cvjetko Bilić

Boxing (2) - Mate Parlov, Petar Miloš

Gymnastics (1) - Damir Anić

Wrestling (2) - Karlo Čović, Milan Nenadić

Sailing (2) - Anton Grego, Simo Nikolić

Basketball (5) - Krešimir Ćosić, Damir Šolman, Zoran Maroević, Nikola Plećaš, Petar Skansi

Swimming (4) - Đurđica Bjedov, Mirjana Šegrt, Ana Boban, Zdenka Gašparac

Water Polo (6) - Karlo Stipanić, Ivan Trumbić, Ozren Bonačić, Ronald Lopatny, Miroslav Poljak, Zdravko Hebel

Medal winners:

Gold - Đurđica Bjedov (Swimming, 100 m Breaststroke)

Gold - Karlo Stipanić, Ivan Trumbić, Ozren Bonačić, Ronald Lopatny, Miroslav Poljak, Zdravko Hebel (National Olympic Water Polo Team)

Silver - Đurđica Bjedov (Swimming, 200 m Breaststroke)

Silver - Krešimir Ćosić, Damir Šolman, Zoran Maroević, Nikola Plećaš, Petar Skansi (National Olympic Basketball Team)

Winter Olympic Games - Sapporo 1972

The XI Olympic Winter Games were held from February 3 to 13, 1972 in Sapporo, Japan.

It was the first time that the Winter Olympics were held in Asia, but also the first Winter Olympics to be held outside Europe or the USA.

There were 1006 athletes from 35 countries competing in 10 sports disciplines.

Luge had its only tie in the history of the Winter Olympics in the men's doubles event.

Croatian athletes in Sapporo - 2

Ice Hockey (2) - Ivan Ratej, Boris Renaud

Olympic Games - München 1972

Games of the XX Olympiad were held from August 26 to September 11, 1972 in Munich, Germany.

The International Olympic Committee selected Munich in the competition with Detroit, Madrid and Montreal. These were the second Olympics in the history held in Germany after the games in Berlin Olympics 1936. Wishing to present Germany to the world as a democratic, modern state full of optimism, the host selected the motto "The Happy Games" and logo in the form of a blue sun and for the first time the Olympics received an official mascot, a dachshund named Waldi.

There were 7134 athletes from 121 countries competing in 28 sports disciplines.

The ceremony of the referees’ oath was first introduced at the Games, aimed at emphasizing the impartiality of judging.

Handball and Archery returned to the Games’ program and new sport were introduced - Slalom Kayaking/Canoeing.

For the first time, the Olympic Oath was taken by a referees’ representative.

Badminton and Water Skiing were Demonstration Sports.

Croatian athletes in Munich - 54

Athletics (5) - Josip Alebić, Luciano Sušanj, Srećko Štiglić, Radojka Franzzoti, Đurđa Fočić

Cycling (2) - Eugen Pleško, Cvjetko Bilić

Boxing (1) - Mate Parlov

Weightlifting (1) - Leopold Herenčić

Gymnastics (4) - Erna Hawelka, Nevenka Puškarević, Olga Bumbić, Ivan Hmjelovac

Wrestling (4) - Josip Čorak, Milan Nenadić, Karlo Čović, Slavko Koletić

Sailing (3) - Minski Fabris, Antun Grego, Simo Nikolić

Kayak/Canoe (3) - Dubravko Matković, Ivan Ohmut, Miloš Kralj

Basketball (5) - Krešimir Ćosić, Vinko Jelovac, Nikola Plećaš, Damir Šolman, Ratomir Tvrdić

Swimming (2) - Giansandro Rudan, Zdenka Gašparac

Handball (7) - Hrvoje Horvat, Zdravko Miljak, Miroslav Pribanić, Dobrivoje Selec, Albin Vidović, Zdenko Zorko, Đorđe Lavrnić

Water Polo (5) - Duško Antunović, Siniša Belamarić, Ozren Bonačić, Ronald Lopatny, Karlo Stipanić

Rowing (12) - Duško Mrduljaš, Nikola Mardešić, Marko Mandić, Ivo Despot, Zdravko Gracin, Mladen Ninić, Roman Bajlo, Zdravko Huljev, Stevo Macura, Janez Grbelja, Josip Bajlo, Jadran Radovčić

Medal winners:

Gold - Mate Parlov (Boxing, -81 kg)

Gold - Miroslav Pribanić, Hrvoje Horvat, Zdravko Miljak, Dobrivoje Selec, Zdenko Zorko, Albin Vidović, Đorđe Lavrnić (National Olympic Handball Team)

Silver - Josip Čorak (Wrestling, Greco-Roman, -90 kg)

Bronze - Milan Nenadić (Wrestling, Greco-Roman, -80 kg)

Winter Olympic Games - Innsbruck 1976

The XII Olympic Winter Games were held from February 4 to 15, 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria.

The International Olympic Committee had a lot of difficulties organizing these Olympics because the first selected host city Denver (USA) had to cancel the organization due to the inability to realize the financial plan and opposition of the citizens at a referendum. The next candidate was Canadian Whistler, but they also encountered difficulties and cancelled the organization after the election of the new government. The IOC then asked the city of Innsbruck, which already had a ready infrastructure because it had organized the Winter Olympics in 1964, to jump in and host - after only 12 years - the Olympics.  

A second cauldron for the Olympic Flame was built to represent the 1976 Olympics and it was lit together with the cauldron from the 1964 Olympics.           

There were 1,123 athletes from 37 countries competing in 10 sports disciplines.

The program of the Games included Figure Skating for pairs.

Ice dance made its Olympic debut at the Innsbruck Olympics.

Sports technology, in the guise of innovative perforated skis, sleek hooded suits and streamlined helmets appeared in Alpine Skiing, Speed Skating and Ski Jumping, making headlines in Innsbruck.

Croatian athletes in Innsbruck - 1

Ice Hockey (1) - Miroslav Gojanović

Olympic Games - Montréal 1976

Games of the XXI Olympiad were held from July 17 to September 1, 1976 in Montreal, Canada.

The International Olympic Committee has opted for Montreal in the competition with Moscow and Los Angeles.

The Olympic Flame was lit according to the custom in the ancient Olympia and then transmitted to Ottawa “electronically”. Namely, the original Flame was used as a source of electrical impulse, which was then transmitted by electromagnetic wave to Canada, where it was used to light a new Olympic Torch that was later transferred to Montreal. During the Games, a rainy storm extinguished the Flame at the stadium and the on-duty officer quickly re-lit the Flame with his cigarette lighter! The organizer quickly reacted, extinguishing the “illegal” flame and using the original Torch’s spare fire to immediately light the Olympic Flame at the stadium.

There were 6,084 athletes from 92 countries competing in 27 sports disciplines.

Women’s events were introduced in Basketball, Handball and Rowing.

Croatian athletes in Montreal - 33

Athletics (6) - Josip Alebić, Luciano Sušanj, Milovan Savić, Jelica Pavličić, Radojka Franzotti, Đurđa Fočić

Cycling (1) - Vladimir Fumić

Judo (1) - Goran Žuvela

Kayak/Canoe (1) - Matija Ljubek

Basketball (5) - Željko Jerkov, Andro Knego, Krešimir Ćosić, Vinko Jelovac, Damir Šolman

Swimming (1) - Zdravko Divjak

Handball (5) - Hrvoje Horvat, Zdravko Miljak, Željko Nimš, Zvonimir Serdarušić, Zdenko Zorko

Water Polo (7) - Duško Antunović, Siniša Belamarić, Ozren Bonačić, Zoran Kačić, Boško Lozica, Damir Polić, Đuro Savinović

Rowing (6) - Duško Mrduljaš, Zlatko Celent, Milan Butorac, Stanko Miloš, Siniša Rutešić, Danko Majstorović

Medal winners:

Gold - Matija Ljubek (Canoe Singles, C-1 1000m)

Silver - Željko Jerkov, Andro Knego, Krešimir Ćosić, Vinko Jelovac, Damir Šolman (National Olympic Basketball Team)

Bronze - Matija Ljubek (Canoe Singles, C-1 500m)

Winter Olympic Games - Lake Placid 1980

The XIII Olympic Winter Games were held from February 13 to 24. 1980 in Lake Placid, USA.

The second candidate, Vancouver, withdrew his candidacy just before the final vote. It was the second time that Lake Placid hosted Winter Olympics because it also hosted Winter Olympics in 1932.

There were 1,072 athletes from 37 countries competing in 10 sports disciplines.

The Games also brought one technological novelty: for the first time, artificial snow was used for competition on ski courses.

Croatian athletes in Lake Placid - 1

Figure Skating (1) - Sanda Dubravčić

Olympic Games - Moscow 1980

Games of the XXII Olympiad were held from July 19 to August 3, 1980 in Moscow, in the then Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

Part of the competition took place in Leningrad, Kiev, Minsk and Tallinn. The symbol of the Games was Olympic teddy bear.

There were 5,179 athletes from 80 countries competing in 27 sports disciplines.

Croatian athletes in Moscow - 51

Athletics (4) - Josip Alebić, Milovan Savić, Željko Knapić, Vladimir Milić

Cycling (1) - Bruno Bulić

Boxing (2) - Damir Škaro, Dejan Marović

Weightlifting (2) - Dušan Mirković, Vladimir Zrnić

Sailing (3) - Minski Fabris, Danko Mandić, Zoran Kalebić

Judo (2) - Vojo Vujević, Slavko Sikirić

Kayak/Canoe (1) - Matija Ljubek

Basketball M (6) - Andro Knego, Mihovil Nakić, Željko Jerkov, Branko Skroče, Krešimir Ćosić, Duje Krstulović

Basketball W (3) - Mira Bjedov, Sanja Ožegović, Zorica Đurković

Football (8) - Nikica Cukrov, Miloš Hrstić, Ivan Gudelj, Tomislav Ivković, Mišo Krstičević, Boro Primorac, Zlatko Vujović, Zoran Vujović

Volleyball (2) - Ivica Jelić, Mladen Kašić

Handball M (2) - Ivica Obrvan, Pavle Jurina

Handball (4) - Ana Titlić, Katica Ileš, Mirjana Ognjenović, Biserka Višnjić

Archery (1) - Zoran Matković

Water Polo (7) - Luko Vezilić, Damir Polić, Zoran Roje, Zoran Mustur, Slobodan Trifunović, Milivoj Bebić, Boško Lozica

Rowing (3) - Duško Mrduljaš, Zlatko Celent, Josip Reić

Medal winners:

Gold - Andro Knego, Mihovil Nakić, Željko Jerkov, Branko Skroče, Krešimir Ćosić, Duje Krstulović (Men’s National Olympic Basketball Team)

Silver - Ana Titlić, Katica Ileš, Mirjana Ognjenović, Biserka Višnjić (Women's National Olympic Handball Team)

Silver - Luko Vezilić, Damir Polić, Zoran Roje, Zoran Mustur, Slobodan Trifunović, Milivoj Bebić, Boško Lozica (National Olympic Water Polo Team)

Bronze - Mira Bjedov, Sanja Ožegović, Zorica Đurković (Women's National Olympic Basketball Team)

Bronze - Duško Mrduljaš, Zlatko Celent, Josip Reić (Men’s Coxed Pairs)

Winter Olympic Games - Sarajevo 1984

The XIV Olympic Winter Games were held from January 8 February 19, 1984 in Sarajevo, in the then SFR Yugoslavia.

Other candidate cities were Sapporo (Japan) and Falun/Göteborg (Sweden).

The Olympic Flame was lit by Zagreb figure skater Sanda Dubravčić.

There were 1,272 athletes from 49 countries competing in 10 sports disciplines.

The 20 km race was added to Women's Nordic Skiing.

Disabled Skiing was a Demonstration Sports for the first time

Croatian athletes in Sarajevo - 8

Figure Skating (2) - Sanda Dubravčić, Miljan Begović

Speed Skating (2) - Dubravka Vukušić-Sertić, Nenad Žvanut

Biathlon (1) - Franjo Jakovac

Bobsleigh (2) - Boris Rađenović, Nikola Korica

Ice Hockey (1) - Drago Mlinarec

Olympic Games - Los Angeles 1984

Games of the XXIII Olympiad were held from July 28 to August 12, 1984 in Los Angeles, USA.

This city was the only candidate for the host and is thus the selection of host city at the International Olympic Committee’s Session in 1978 was simple. The main reason for low interest was the financial failure of the Montreal Olympics 1976. However, the organizing committee of the LA Olympics balanced the costs and revenues well and at the end, according to the profits earned, the Games were more than successful.

The 1984 Summer Olympics were preceded by the 10-week-long adjunct Los Angeles Olympic Arts Festival, which provided more than 400 performances by 146 theater, dance and music companies, representing every continent and 18 countries.

There were 6,829 athletes from 140 countries competing in 29 sports disciplines.

The sports program included - for the first time - Synchronized Swimming, Rhythmic Gymnastics and Windsurfing, as well as Women’s Marathon. Tennis returned to the program, but as a Demonstration Sports, along with Baseball.

Eight years after the Montreal Olympics, canoer Matija Ljubek won again two medals -  this time a gold and silver one in pair with Mirko Nišović.

Croatian athletes in Los Angeles - 42

Athletics (2) - Hrvoje Fižuleto, Novica Čanović

Cycling (1) - Bruno Bulić

Boxing (1) - Damir Škaro

Wrestling (1) - Vlado Lisjak

Judo (1) - Vojo Vujević

Kayak/Canoe (1) - Matija Ljubek

Basketball M (6) - Dražen Petrović, Aleksandar Petrović, Ivan Sunara, Branko Vukičević, Andro Knego, Mihovil Nakić

Basketball W (2) - Sanja Ožegović, Marija Uzelac

Football (6) - Ivan Pudar, Nenad Gračan, Borislav Cvetković, Tomislav Ivković, Stjepan Deverić, Branko Miljuš

Swimming (1) - Hrvoje Barić

Handball M (2) - Zdravko Zovko, Pavao Jurina

Handball (3) - Jasna Ptujec, Mirjana Ognjenovic, Biserka Visnjić

Shooting (1) - Biserka Vrbek

Tennis (Demonstration Sports, 2) - Sabrina Goleš, Renata Goofy

Water Polo (9) - Deni Lušić, Bozo Vuletić, Veselin Đuho, Zoran Roje, Milivoj Bebić, Perica Bukić, Dragan Andrić, Goran Sukno, Tomislav Paškvalin

Rowing (3) - Zlatko Celent, Mirko Ivančić, Dario Vidošević

Medal winners:

Gold - Matija Ljubek (in pair with Mirko Nišović, C-2 500m)

Gold - Vlado Lisjak (Wrestling Greco-Roman Style, -68kg)

Gold - Jasna Ptujec, Mirjana Ognjenović, Biserka Višnjić (Women's National Olympic Handball Team)

Gold - Zdravko Zovko, Pavao Jurina (Men’s National Olympic Handball Team)

Gold - Deni Lušić, Božo Vuletić, Veselin Đuho, Zoran Roje, Milivoj Bebić, Perica Bukić, Dragan Andrić, Goran Sukno, Tomislav Paškvalin (National Olympic Water Polo Team)

Silver - Matija Ljubek (in pair with Mirko Nišović, C-2 1000m)

Silver - Sabrina Goleš (Tennis, Singles)

Bronze - Ivan Pudar, Nenad Gračan, Borislav Cvetković, Tomislav Ivković, Stjepan Deverić, Branko Miljuš (National Olympic Football Team)

Bronze - Dražen Petrović, Aleksandar Petrović, Ivan Sunara, Branko Vukičević, Andro Knego, Mihovil Nakić (National Olympic Basketball Team)

Olympic Games - Seoul 1988

Games of the XXIV Olympiad were held from September 17 to October 2, 1988 in Seoul, South Korea.

The International Olympic Committee favored Seoul as a host city in the competition of the Japanese city of Nagoya.

These were also the last Summer Olympic Games to hold the Opening Ceremony during the daytime.

There were 8,391 athletes from 159 countries competing in 31 sports disciplines.

Tennis returned to the program of the Games, while Table Tennis made its Olympic debut.

For the first time in the history, all the Dressage events were won by women.

Women's Judo was held for the first time, as a Demonstration Sports.                     

Table Tennis was introduced at these Olympics.

Tennis returned to the Olympics after a 64-year absence.

These Olympics featured two Demonstration Sports – Baseball and Taekwondo.

Croatian athletes in Seoul - 48

Athletics (3) - Branko Zorko, Slobodanka Čolović, Biljana Petrović

Boxing (3) - Damir Škaro, Željko Mavrović, Darko Dukić

Wrestling (1) - Bernard Ban

Kayak/Canoe (2) - Matija Ljubek, Ivan Šabjan

Basketball M (7) - Franjo Arapović, Danko Cvjetičanin, Zoran Čutura, Toni Kukoč, Dražen Petrović, Dino Rađa, Stojko Vranković

Basketball W (3) - Kornelija Kvesić, Žana Lelas, Danira Nakić-Bilić

Football (2) - Davor Šuker, Ivica Barbarić

Swimming (1) - Anamarija Petričević

Handball M (6) - Mirko Bašić, Irfan Smajlagić, Alvaro Načinović, Goran Perkovac, Iztok Puc, Boris Jarak

Handball (2) - Nataša Kolega, Slavica Rinčić

Table Tennis (1) - Zoran Primorac, Jasna Fazlić

Shooting (1) - Mladenka Malenica

Taekwondo (3) - Ivica Klaić, Robert Tomašević, Dražen Perković

Tennis (2) - Goran Ivanišević, Sabrina Goleš

Water Polo (8) - Mislav Bezmalinovic, Perica Bukić, Veselin Đuho, Deni Lušić, Tomislav Paškvalin, Renco Posinković, Dubravko Šimenc, Dragan Andrić

Rowing (3) - Zlatko Celent, Sead Marušić, Dario Varga
 

Medal winners:
Gold - Mislav Bezmalinović, Perica Bukić, Veselin Đuho, Deni Lušić, Tomislav Paskvalin, Renco Posinković, Dubravko Šimenc, Dragan Andrić (National Olympic Water Polo Team)

Silver - Franjo Arapović, Danko Cvjetičanin, Zoran Čutura, Toni Kukoč, Dražen Petrović, Dino Rađa, Stojko Vranković (Men’s National Olympic Basketball Team)

Silver - Zoran Primorac (Table Tennis, Pairs, with Ilie Lupulescu)

Silver - Kornelija Kvesić, Žana Lelas, Danira Nakić-Bilić (Women's National Olympic Basketball Team)

Bronze - Mirko Bašić, Irfan Smajlagić, Alvaro Načinović, Goran Perkovac, Iztok Puc, Boris Jarak (Men’s National Olympic Handball Team)

Bronze - Damir Škaro (Boxing, -81 kg)

Bronze - Jasna Fazlić (Table Tennis, Pairs)

Winter Olympic Games - Calgary 1988

The XV Olympic Winter Games were held from February 13 to 28, 1988 in Calgary, Canada.

This city was already a candidate for Winter Olympics in 1964 and in 1968 but became a host city yet in its third attempt, in the competition with Falun and Cortina d'Ampezzo.

There were 1,423 athletes from 57 countries competing in 10 sports disciplines.

These Olympics included four Demonstration Sports – Curling, Disabled Skiing, Freestyle Skiing and Short Track Speed Skating.

Croatian athletes in Calgary - 1  
Figure Skating (1) - Željka Čižmešija

Winter Olympic Games - Albertville 1992

The XVI Olympic Winter Games were held from February 8 to 23, 1992 in Albertville, France.

Other host city candidates were Anchorage, Berchtesgaden, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Lillehammer, Falun and Sofia.

These were the last Winter Olympics held in the same year as Summer Olympics. Since then, the Winter Olympics are held two years apart from the Summer Olympics, every non-leap year.

There were 1,801 athletes from 64 countries competing in 12 sports disciplines.

These Games recorded the interesting appearance of the so-called Unified Team that consisted of competitors from the former republics of the collapsed Union of Soviet Socialist Republics: Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Uzbekistan and Armenia.

Winter Olympics in Albertville were the first Games in the history at which the Croatian female and male athletes, the four of them, performed independently.

Freestyle Skiing Moguls, Short-Track Speed Skating and Women's Biathlon made their debuts as medal disciplines.

At these Olympics, the Demonstration Sports were Curling and Freestyle Skiing sub-categories -  Aerials (discipline at Lillehammer Olympics), Ski Ballet and Speed Skiing.

These were the last Olympics where Speed Skating was held outdoors.

Croatian athletes in Albertville - 4

Figure Skating (2) - Željka Čižmešija, Tomislav Čižmešija

Alpine Skiing - Vedran Pavlek

Cross-Country Skiing - Siniša Vukonić

The Croatian flag was borne by Tomislav Čižmešija at the Opening and by Siniša Vukonić at the Closing Ceremony.

Olympic Games - Barcelona 1992

Games of the XXV Olympiad were held from July 25 to August 9, 1992 in Barcelona, Spain.

The host city candidates were also Amsterdam, Belgrade, Birmingham, Brisbane and Paris, but the International Olympic Committee selected Barcelona, the birthplace of the former IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch.
After the Munich Olympics in 1972, these were the first Olympics to be attended by all the members of the Olympic movement, after a series of Games that were boycotted by individual countries. After 28-years’ suspension, South Africa was again allowed the appearance and Germany participated again as reunited.

The Olympic cauldron was ignited by using a flaming arrow, lit from the Flame of the Olympic Torch. It was shot by Paralympic archer Antonio Rebollo, who aimed the arrow over the top of the Cauldron to ignite the gas emanating from it.
Following its reunification in 1990, Germany sent a unified Olympic Team for the first time after the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Following the separation of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Croatia, Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina had its Olympic debut at Barcelona Olympics.

There were 9,356 athletes from 169 countries competing in 34 sports disciplines.

The program of the Games included Badminton, Baseball (after being a Demonstration Sports six times) and Judo for women, while Slalom Kayaking/Canoeing returned to the program (the discipline of Slalom).
Roller Hockey, Basque Pelota and Taekwondo were all Demonstration Sports at the 1992 Summer Olympics.

Croatian athletes in Barcelona - 39

Athletics (2) - Branko Zorko, Ivan Mustapić
Boxing (1) - Željko Mavrović
Wrestling (1) - Stipe Damjanović
Sailing (3) - Karlo Kuret, Bojan Grego, Sebastijan Miknić
Kayak/Canoe (4) - Danko Herceg, Stjepan Perestegi, Zvonimir Krznarić, Vlado Poslek
Equestrian (1) - Hermann Weiland
Basketball (12) - Vladan Alanović, Franjo Arapović, Danko Cvjetičanin, Alan Gregov, Arijan Komazec, Toni Kukoč, Aramis Naglić, Velimir Perasović, Dražen Petrović, Dino Rađa, Žan Tabak, Stojko Vranković
Table Tennis (2) - Dragutin Šurbek, Zoran Primorac
Shooting (4) - Željko Vađić, Jasminka Francki, Suzana Skoko, Mirela Skoko
Tennis (2) - Goran Ivanišević, Goran Prpić
Rowing (7) - Sead Marušić, Marko Banović, Ninoslav Saraga, Aleksandar Fabijanić, Goran Puljko (Coxed Four), Zlatko Buzina, Marko Perinović (Coxless Pairs)
Taekwondo (Demonstration Sports, 2) - Dragan Jurilj, Miet Filipović

Medal winners:

Silver - Croatian National Olympic Basketball Team
Bronze - Goran Ivanišević (Tennis, Singles)
Bronze - Goran Ivanišević and Goran Prpić (Tennis, Doubles)

The Croatian flag was borne by Goran Ivanišević at the Opening and by Dražen Petrović at the Closing Ceremony.

Winter Olympic Games - Lillehammer 1994

The XVII Olympic Winter Games were held from February 12 to 27, 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway.

Other candidate cities were Anchorage, Östersund and Sofia.

The Olympics were held only two years after the previous Winter Olympics in Albertville due to changes in the rhythm of holding the Winter Olympics. Since then, all the Winter Olympics have been held in even, non-leap years, while the Summer Olympics continued to be held in leap years.
The Olympic Flame was to be skied down the skijump before lighting the cauldron.

There were 1.737 athletes from 67 countries competing in 12 sports disciplines.

Aerials was added as a discipline, after being a Demonstration Sports at the previous two Olympics. Ski Ballet, Demonstration Sports in 1992, was dropped.

Croatian athletes in Lillehammer - 3

Cross-Country Skiing (2) - Siniša Vukonić, Antonio Rački
Alpine Skiing (1) - Vedran Pavlek
The Croatian flag was borne by Vedran Pavlek both at the Opening and Closing Ceremony.

Olympic Games - Atlanta 1996

Games of the XXVI Olympiad were held from July 19 to August 4, 1996 in Atlanta, USA.

Other candidate cities were Athens, Belgrade, Manchester, Melbourne and Toronto. Despite the expectation that the 1996 Olympics, held on the centennial anniversary of the first Olympic Games of the modern age, will be assigned to Greece or Athens, that did not happen. The IOC announced in its clarification that the situation and number of sports venues in Athens at the time of decision on the host city were inappropriate to successfully organize the 1996 Olympics. Athens later won the organization of the 2004 Olympics.

These Olympics are also referred to as the Centennial Olympic Games.

There were 10,3018 athletes from 197 countries competing in 37 sports disciplines.

Softball, Beach Volleyball and Mountain Biking made their debut at these Olympics, as well as Women's Football and Lightweight Rowing.

Croatian athletes in Atlanta - 84

Athletics (4) - Branko Zorko, Ivan Mustapić, Dragan Mustapić, Siniša Ergotić
Boxing (1) - Stipe Drviš
Gymnastics (1) - Alexei Demjanov
Wrestling (1) - Stipe Damjanović
Sailing (3) - Karlo Kuret, Ivan Kuret, Marko Mišura
Kayak/Canoe (4) - Andrej Glücks, Danko Herceg, Ivan Šabjan, Dražen Funtak
Basketball (12) - Stojko Vranković, Veljko Mršić, Dino Rađa, Damir Mulaomerović, Toni Kukoč, Slaven Rimac, Arijan Komazec, Josip Vranković, Velimir Perasović, Davor Marcelić, Vladan Alanović, Žan Tabak
Swimming (11) - Gabrijela Ujčić, Tinka Dančević, Marko Strahija, Tomislav Karlo, Dominik Galić, Miloš Milošević, Alen Lončar, Marijan Kanjer, Miroslav Vučetić, Krešimir Čač, Gordan Kožulj
Handball (15) - Patrik Ćavar, Slavko Goluža, Božidar Jović, Nenad Kljaić, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Alvaro Načinović, Goran Perkovac, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Irfan Smajlagić, Bruno Gudelj, Zoran Mikulić, Vladimir Jelčić, Valner Franković, Vladimir Šujster
Table Tennis (4) - Tamara Boroš, Zoran Primorac, Eldijana Aganović, Damir Atiković
Shooting (4) - Mladenka Malenica, Suzana Skoko-Kovačević, Mirela Skoko, Roman Špirelja
Tennis (4) - Iva Majoli, Goran Ivanišević, Maja Murić, Saša Hiršzon
Water Polo (13) - Maro Balić, Perica Bukić, Damir Glavan, Igor Hinić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Joško Kreković, Ognjen Kržić, Dubravko Šimenc, Siniša Školneković, Ratko Štritof, Renato Vrbičić, Zdeslav Vrdoljak, Tino Vegar
Rowing (8) - Marko Banović, Ninoslav Saraga, Siniša Skelin, Sead Marušić, Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Hrvoje Telišman, Danijel Bajlo

Medal winners:

Gold - Croatian National Olympic Handball Team
Silver - Croatian National Olympic Water Polo Team

The Croatian flag was borne by Perica Bukić at the Opening and by Goran Perkovac at the Closing Ceremony.

Winter Olympic Games - Nagano 1998

The XVIII Olympic Winter Games were held from February 7 to 22 , 1998 in Nagano, Japan.

The International Olympic Committee selected Nagano as a host city in the competition with Aosta,  Jaca, Östersund, Salt Lake City and Sochi.
The Organizing Committee recognized three goals to the Games, which they referred to as the “Games from the Heart” - promote youth participation, coexistence with nature, create a festival with peace and friendship at its center.

There were 2,176 athletes from 72 countries competing in 14 sports disciplines.

Women’s Ice Hockey, Curling and Snowboarding made their Olympic debut at these Games.

Croatian athletes in Nagano - 6

Alpine Skiing (4) - Janica Kostelić, Vedran Pavlek, Renato Gašpar, Thomas Lodler
Cross-Country Skiing (1) - Antonio Rački
Figure Skating (1) - Ivana Jakupčević

The Croatian flag was borne by Janica Kostelić at the Opening and by Vedran Pavlek at the Closing Ceremony.

Olympic Games - Nagano 1998

Games of the XXVII Olympiad were held from September 15 to October 1, 2000 in Sydney, Australia.

In 1993, the International Olympic Committee selected iSydney as host city in the competition with  Beijing, Berlin, Istanbul and Manchester.

These Olympics are also commonly known as Sydney 2000 or the Millennium Olympic Games/Games of the New Millennium.

At the spectacular Opening Ceremony, the Olympic Flame at the stadium was lit by Cathy Freeman, who later won gold in the 400 meters race at these Games. She became the first person to both light the Olympic Flame and win a medal at the same Olympics.

A record number of nations participated at the Olympics and the only IOC member who did not participate was Afghanistan, whose performance was banned by the then-Afghan Taliban regime for religious reasons.

Special quarantine conditions were introduced to allow entry of horses into Australia to participate in Equestrian events in order to avoid the need for such events to take place elsewhere as had happened at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne.

There were 10,651 athletes from 199 countries competing in 40 sports disciplines.

Triathlon was included in the program of the Games.

Curling was included in the program, making its official Olympic debut following its appearances as Demonstration Sports.

Although Demonstration Sports were abolished following the 1992 Summer Olympics, the Sydney Olympics featured Wheelchair Racing as exhibition events on the Athletics schedule.

Croatian athletes in Sydney - 91

Athletics (16) - Frano Bakarić, Tihomir Buinjac, Ivana Brkljačić, Stevimir Ercegovac, Siniša Ergotić, Nino Habun, Andraš Haklić, Darko Juričić, Slaven Krajačić, Dragan Mustapić, Ivica Nekić, Kristina Perica, Elvis Peršić, Blanka Vlašić, Dejan Vojnović, Branko Zorko

Weightlifting (1) - Nikolaj Pešalov

Sailing (4) - Mate Arapov, Toni and Ivan Bulaja, Karlo Kuret

Kayak/Canoe (4) - Danko Herceg, Andrej Glücks, Nikica Ljubek, Dražen Funtak

Volleyball (12) - Marija Anzulović, Jelena Čebukina, Patricija Daničić, Biljana Gligorović, Vesna Jelić, Barbara Jelić, Gordana Jurcan, Ana Kaštelan, Nataša Leto, Marijana Ribičić, Beti Rimac, Ingrid Siscovich

Swimming (15) - Vanja Rogulj, Marijan Kanjer, Ivan Mladina, Duje Draganja, Alen Lončar, Gordan Kožulj, Marko Strahija, Sandro Tomas, Smiljana Marinović, Petra Banović, Miloš Milošević, Marijana Šurković, Lovrenco Franičević, Tinka Dančević, Krešimir Čač

Table Tennis (4) - Eldijana Aganović, Tamara Boroš, Andrea Bakula, Zoran Primorac

Shooting (2) - Mladenka Malenica, Roman Špirelja

Taekwondo (1) - Nataša Vezmar

Tennis (5) - Iva Majoli, Silvija Talaja, Goran Ivanišević, Ivan Ljubičić, Mario Ančić

Water Polo (13) - Samir Barač, Alen Bošković, Elvis Fatovic, Igor Hinić, Ivo Ivaniš, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Ognjen Kržić, Višeslav Sarić, Mile Smodlaka, Dubravko Šimenc, Siniša Školneković, Ratko Štritof, Frano Vićan

Rowing (13) - Ivan Jukić, Tihomir Jarnjević, Ninoslav Saraga, Oliver Martinov, Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Krešimir Čuljak, Igor Francetić, Branimir Vujević, Tomislav Smoljanović, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin and Silvijo Petriško

Medal winners:

Gold - Nikolaj Pešalov (Weightlifting, -62 kg)
Bronze - Rowing, Coxed Eight (Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Krešimir Čuljak, Igor Francetić, Branimir Vujević, Tomislav Smoljanović, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin and coxwain Silvijo Petriško)

The Croatian flag was borne by Zoran Primorac at the Opening and by Igor Boraska at the Closing Ceremony.

Winter Olympic Games - Salt Lake City 2002

The XIX Olympic Winter Games were held from February 8 to 24, 2002 in Salt Lake City, USA.

Other candidate cities were Quebec City, Sion and Östersund.

The Opening Ceremony’s segment celebrated all the previous hosts of the Olympic Winter Games.

There were 2,399 athletes from 78 countries competing in 15 sports disciplines.

Our skier Janica Kostelić impressed the world with three gold and one silver medal, the first Winter Olympic medals for Croatia in the history.

Skeleton returned as a medal sport at the 2002 Olympics, for the first time since 1948.

Women's Bobsleigh event had its debut at these Olympics.

These Games featured the emergence of extreme sports, such as Snowboarding, Moguls and Aerials, which appeared at previous Olympic Winter Games but have captured greater public attention in recent years.

Croatian athletes in Salt Lake City - 14

Alpine Skiing (4) - Janica Kostelić, Nika Fleiss, Ana Jelušić, Ivica Kostelić

Biathlon (1) - Žarko Galjanić

Bobsleigh (5) - Ivan Šola, Boris Lovrić,  Đuliano Koludra, Niki Drpić, Igor Boraska

Cross-Country Skiing (3) - Maja Kezele, Damir Jurčević, Denis Klobučar

Figure Skating (1) - Idora Hegel

Medal winners:

Gold - Janica Kostelić (Combined)
Gold - Janica Kostelić (Slalom)
Gold - Janica Kostelic (Giant Slalom)
Silver - Janica Kostelic (Super-G)

The Croatian flag was borne by Janica Kostelić at the Opening and by Ivan Šola at the Closing Ceremony.

Olympic Games - Athens 2004

Games of the XXVIII Olympiad were held from August 13 to 29, 2004 in Athens, Greece.

After Athens surprisingly did not receive the organization of Olympic Games in 1996 on the centennial anniversary of modern Olympism, the International Olympic Committee of the Games was still awarded to the country Olympism. The opponents were Rome, Cape Town, Stockholm and Buenos Aires, while Istanbul, Lille, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan, Seville and Saint Petersburg had dropped out of the competition earlier.

These were the first Olympics in the history to have all the countries that had their official National Olympic Committee at the time and were members of the IOC participating. Although Athens had a lot of problems during the preparation of the Olympics, all the venues - despite the construction delays -were still completed in time for the competitions. It is a special curiosity that some competitions were held at the ancient stadium in Olympia, so it was noted that the first winner at the ancient arena in the modern era was Cuban female shot putter Yumileidi Jizba.

The defile of the participating countries was organized in the order of the Greek alphabet. Since it is customary for the parade to be opened by athletes from Greece and closed by host athletes, this time it was decided that the parade begins with the Greek flag entry, and that Greek athletes enter the stadium last.

The old tradition of Olympic Torch travelling from Greece to the host city of the Olympics was this time slightly modified - after the lighting ceremony on March 25, 2004 in Ancient Olympia, the Olympic Torch made a tour around the world and then went back to the beginning. For the first time ever, the Torch travelled around the world in a relay to various Olympic cities (past and future) and other large cities, before returning to Greece.

There were 10,625 athletes from 201 countries competing in 40 sports disciplines.

Swimming, Diving, Synchronized Swimming and Water Polo were classified by the IOC as disciplines within the Aquatics and Wheelchair Racing was a Demonstration Sports.

For  the first time, the Wrestling category featured Women’s Wrestling and in the Fencing competition women competed in Sabre.

The Marathon was held on the same route as in the 1896 Games, beginning in place of the Battle of Marathon to the Panathenaic Stadium in Athens.

The Demonstration Sports of Wheelchair Racing was a joint Olympic/Paralympic event, allowing a Paralympic event to occur within the Olympics.

Croatian athletes in Athens - 81

Athletics (12) - Ivana Brkljačić (Hammer Throw), Siniša Ergotić (Long Jump), Edis Elkasević (Sphere), Sanja Gavrilović (Hammer Throw), Jurica Grabušić (110m Hurdles), Blanka Vlašić (High Jump), Vera Begić (Discus Throw), Branko Zorko (1500m), Edi Ponoš (Spear), Andras Haklits (Hammer Throw), Nedžad Mulabegović (Shot Put), Dragan Mustapić (Discus Throw)

Boxing (2) - Vedran Đipalo, Marijo Sutolija-Jelica

Weightlifting (1) - Nikolaj Pešalov

Sailing (4) - Mate Arapov, Tomislav Bašić, Petar Cupać, Karlo Kuret

Kayak/Canoe (3) - Danko Herceg, Dinko Mulić, Emanuel Horvatiček

Equestrian (1) - Josef Puch

Swimming (13) - Duje Draganja, Sanja Jovanović, Gordan Kožulj, Mario Delač, Nenad Buljan, Vanja Rogulj, Krešimir Čač, Saša Imprić, Ivan Mladina, Igor Čerenšek, Petra Banović, Anita Galić, Smiljana Marinović

Handball (15) - Ivano Balić, Davor Dominković, Mirza Džomba, Slavko Goluža, Nikša Kaleb, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Petar Metličić, Vlado Šola, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Igor Vori, Drago Vuković, Vedran Zrnić

Table Tennis (3) - Tamara Boroš, Zoran Primorac, Cornelia Vaida

Shooting (1) - Mirela Skoko-Ćelić

Taekwondo (2) - Sandra Šarić, Nataša Vezmar

Tennis (5) - Jelena Kostanić, Karolina Šprem, Mario Ančić, Ivo Karlović, Ivan Ljubičić

Water Polo (13) - Samir Barać, Damir Burić, Elvis Fatović, Nikola Franković, Igor Hinić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Danijel Premuš, Mile Smodlaka, Dubravko Šimenc, Ratko Štritof, Frano Vićan, Goran Volarević, Tihomil Vranješ

Rowing (7) - Igor Boraska, Marko Dragičević, Petar Milin, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin, Damir Vučičić, Davorin Šindler

Medal winners:

Gold - Croatian National Olympic Handball Team

Silver - Duje Draganja (50m Freestyle)

Silver - Siniša and Nikša Skelin (Rowing, Coxless Pairs)

Bronze - Mario Ančić and Ivan Ljubičić (Tennis, Doubles)

Bronze - Nikolaj Pešalov (Weightlifting)

The Croatian flag was borne by Dubravko Šimenc at the Opening and by Siniša Skelin at the Closing Ceremony.

Winter Olympic Games - Turin 2006

The XX Olympic Winter Games were held from February 10 to 26, 2006 in Turin, Italy.

Other candidate cities were Helsinki, Klagenfurt, Poprad-Tatry, Sion and Zakopane. It was the second time that Italy hosted the Winter Olympics after the Cortina d'Ampezzo Olympics in 1956.

There were 2,508 athletes from 80 countries competing in 15 sports disciplines.

Mass Start Biathlon, Team Sprint Cross-Country Skiing, Snowboard Cross and Team Pursuit Speed Skating made their Olympic debut at Turin Olympics. Instead of classic style Cross-Country Skiing 50 km (men) and 30 km (women), in Turin these events were alternated with freestyle events of the same distance.

By winning a gold medal, our Janica Kostelić has become the most successful alpine skier in the history by the number of gold Olympic medals. She won four of them: one in Turin and three at the Winter Olympics 2002. Swedish Anja Pärson won three medals in Turin (gold in Slalom).

Croatian athletes in Turin - 24

Alpine Skiing (12) - Janica Kostelić, Ivica Kostelić, Nika Fleiss, Ana Jelušić, Matea Ferk, Tin Široki, Danko Marinelli, Dalibor Šamšal, Natko Zrnčić Dim, Ivan Ratkić, Ivan Olivari, Yvonne Schnock

Cross-Country Skiing (4) - Maja Kezele, Alen Abramović, Damir Jurčević, Denis Klobučar

Biathlon (1) - Petra Starčević

Bobsleigh (5) - Ivan Šola, Slaven Krajačić, Dejan Vojnović, Jurica Grabušić, Alek Osmanović

Figure Skating (1) - Idora Hegel

Skeleton (1) - Nikola Nimac

Medal winners:

Gold - Janica Kostelić (Alpine Skiing, Combined)

Silver - Janica Kostelic (Alpine Skiing, Super-G)

Silver - Ivica Kostelić (Alpine Skiing, Combined)

The Croatian flag was borne by Janica Kostelić at the Opening and by Ivan Šola at the Closing Ceremony.

Olympic Games - Beijing 2008

Games of the XXIX Olympiad were held from August 8 to 24, 2008 in Beijing, China.

Beijing was elected to host the Olympic Games on July 13, 2001 at the IOC’s 112th Session in Moscow, beating out Toronto, Paris, Istanbul and Osaka.

The Olympic Games’ Opening and Closing Ceremony, as well as many competitions, were held at the National Stadium in Beijing, also known as the "The Bird's Nest".

The Opening Ceremony was proclaimed by spectators and numerous international presses as spectacular and spellbinding and by many accounts "the greatest ever in the history of Olympics".

There were 10,942 athletes from 204 countries competing in 41 sports disciplines.

The program of the Games included several new events - two new Cycling disciplines of BMX, Women’s 3000m Steeplechase, Open Water Swimming for men and women and Team Competition in Table Tennis that replaced the Doubles event.

In fencing, Women's Team Foil and Women's Team Sabre replaced Men's Team Foil and Women's Team Épée.

In addition to the official Olympic sports, the Beijing Organizing Committee was given special dispensation by the IOC to run a Wushu competition in parallel to the Games.

Croatian athletes in Beijing - 101

Athletics (10) - Vera Begić (Discus Throw), Ivana Brkljačić (Hammer Throw), Vanja Perišić (800m), Blanka Vlašić (High Jump), Nikolina Horvat (400m Hurdles), Jurica Grabušić (110m Hurdles), Andras Haklits (Hammer Throw), Nedžad Mulabegović (Shot Put), Martin Marić (Discus Throw), Sanja Gavrilović (Hammer Throw)

Cycling (3) - Matija Kvasina, Vladimir Miholjević, Radoslav Rogina (Men’s Road Race)

Boxing (2) - Marijo Šivolija-Jelica, Marko Tomasović

Gymnastics (2) - Tina Erceg (All-Around), Filip Ude (Floor, Pommel Horse)

Sailing (10) - Mateja Petronijević, Petar Cupać, Šime Fantela, Ivan Kljakovic-Gašpić, Pavle Kostov, Igor Marenić, Luka Mratović, Marin Lovrović, Siniša Mikuličić, Luka Radelić

Kayak/Canoe (2) - Stjepan Janić, Emir Mujčinović

Basketball (12) - Roko-Leni Ukić, Davor Kus, Marko Popović, Marin Rozić, Nikola Prkačin, Marko Tomas, Zoran Planinić, Sandro Nicević, Marko Banić, Krešimir Lončar, Stanko Barač, Damjan Rudež

Swimming (15) - Sanja Jovanović, Monika Babok, Smiljana Marinović, Anja Trišić, Duje Draganja, Marko Strahija, Mario Todorović, Gordan Kožulj, Aleksej Puninski, Bruno Barbić, Ante Cvitković, Saša Imprić, Vanja Rogulj, Nikša Roki, Dominik Straga

Handball (15) - Mirko Alilović, Ivano Balić, Davor Dominiković, Domagoj Duvnjak, Mirza Džomba, Zlatko Horvat, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Petar Metličić, Renato Sulić, Goran Šprem, Tonči Valčić, Igor Vori, Ljubo Vukić, Drago Vuković

Table Tennis (6) - Tamara Boroš, Sandra Paović, Andrea Bakula, Zoran Primorac, Rui Wu Tan, Andrej Gaćina

Shooting (4) - Suzana Cimbal-Špirelja, Snježana Pejčić, Josip Glasnović, Petar Gorša

Taekwondo (2) - Sandra Šarić, Martina Zubčić

Tennis (1) - Marin Čilić

Water Polo (13) - Samir Barać, Miho Bošković, Damir Burić, Andro Bušlje, Teo Đogaš, Igor Hinić, Maro Joković, Aljoša Kunac, Pavo Marković, Josip Pavić, Mile Smodlaka, Frano Vićan, Zdeslav Vrdoljak

Rowing (4) - Ante Kušurin, Mario Vekić, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin

Medal winners:

Silver - Filip Ude (Gymnastics, Pommel Horse)

Silver - Blanka Vlašić (Athletics, High Jump)

Bronze - Snježana Pejčić (Shooting, Air Rifle 10m)

Bronze - Martina Zubčić (Taekwondo, -57 kg)

Bronze - Sandra Šarić (Taekwondo, -67 kg)

The Croatian flag was borne by Ivano Balić at the Opening and by Tamara Boroš at the Closing Ceremony.

Winter Olympic Games - Vancouver 2010

The XXI Winter Olympics were held from February 12 to 28,  2010 in Vancouver, Canada.

All Alpine Skiing event were held on Whistler Mountain, while Nordic events in the Callaghan Valley.

Vancouver won the bid to host the Olympics at the IOC’s 115th Session in Prague in 2003. The other candidates were Austrian city of Salzburg and Korean city of PyeongChang.

There were 2,566 athletes from 82 countries competing in 15 sports disciplines.

Croatian athletes in Vancouver - 19

Alpine Skiing (10) - Ivica Kostelić, Ana Jelušić, Nika Fleiss, Natko Zrnčić Dim, Sofija Novoselić, Dalibor Šamšal, Ivan Ratkić, Tea Palić, Danko Marinelli, Matea Ferk

Cross-Country Skiing (2) - Nina Bronzić, Andrej Burić

Biathlon (2) - Jakov Fak, Andrijana Stipančić Mrvelj

Bobsleigh (5) - Ivan Šola, Slaven Krajačić, Igor Marić, Mate Mezulić, Andras Haklits

Medal winners:

Silver - Ivica Kostelić (Alpine Skiing, Slalom)

Silver - Ivica Kostelić (Alpine Skiing, Super-G)

Bronze - Jakov Fak (Biathlon, 10 km)

The Croatian flag was borne by Jakov Fak at the Opening and by Ivan Šola at the Closing Ceremony.

Olympic Games - London 2012

Games of the XXX Olympiad were held from July 27 to August 12, 2012 in London, UK.

London became the first city in which the modern Olympics were held three times after the Olympics held in 1908 and in 1948.

London was selected for the host on July 6, 2005 at the IOC’s 117th Session in Singapore, defeating Moscow, New York, Madrid and Paris after four rounds of voting.

There were 10,568 athletes from 204 countries competing in 39 sports disciplines.

Compared to the Beijing Olympics, Baseball and Softball were dropped out of the program in accordance with the IOC’s voting decision.

Women’s Boxing made its Olympic debut at these Olympics.

Croatian athletes in London - 107

Athletics (9) - Ana Šimić (High Jump), Lisa Christina Stublić (Marathon), Martin Maric (Discus Throw), Roland Robert Varga (Discus Throw) Sandra Perković (Discus Throw), Nedžad Mulabegović (Shot Put), Ivan Horvat (Pole Vault), Andras Haklits (Hammer Throw), Nikolina Horvat (400m Hurdles)

Cycling (2) - Kristijan Đurasek, Radoslav Rogina (Men’s Road Race)

Open Water Swimming (1) - Karla Šitić (Marathon 10km)

Gymnastics (2) - Filip Ude (All-Around), Tina Erceg (All-Around)

Wrestling (2) - Neven Žugaj (Greco-Roman Style, cat.-74 kg), Nenad Žugaj (Greek-Roman Style, cat.-84 kg)

Sailing (12) - Petar Cupać (49er/Skiff), Šime Fantela (470 /(two-seater), Ivan Kljaković Gašpić (Finn), Pavle Kostov (49er/Skiff/), Igor Marenić (470 /two-seater), Tina Mihelić (Laser Radial), Luka Mratović (RS:X), Tonći Stipanović (Laser), Dan Lovrović (Star), Marin Lovrović (Star), Enia Ninčević (470w), Romana Župan (470w)

Judo (2) - Tomislav Marijanović (-81kg), Marijana Mišković (-63kg)

Kayak/Canoe (1) - Dinko Mulić (Slalom)

Croatian National Olympic Basketball Team/W (12) - Sandra Mandir, Anđa Jelavić, Antonija Mišura, Lisa Ann Karčić, Emanuela Salopek, Marija Vrsaljko, Iva Ciglar, Ana Lelas, Iva Slišković, Mirna Mazić, Luca Ivanković, Jelena Ivezić

Fencing (1) - Bojan Jovanović (Individual Foil)                                                   

Swimming (3) - Kim Daniela Pavlin (200m Backstroke, 200m Individual Medley), Sanja Jovanović (100m Backstroke), Mario Todorović (50m Freestyle)

Croatian National Olympic Handball Team/M (15) - Mirko Alilović, Venio Losert, Manuel Štrlek, Ivan Ninčević, Ivan Čupić, Zlatko Horvat, Igor Vori, Jakov Gojun, Drago Vuković, Blaženko Lacković, Domagoj Duvnjak, Ivano Balić, Marko Kopljar, Denis Buntić, Damir Bičanić

Croatian National Olympic Handball Team/W (14) - Jelena Grubišić, Nikica Pušić Koroljević, Ivana Jelčić, Miranda Tatari, Vesna Milanović Litre, Lidija Horvat, Ivana Lovrić, Andrea Penezić, Kristina Franić, Sonja Bašić, Andrea Šerić, Dijana Jovetić, Anita Gaće, Maja Zebić

Table Tennis (4) - Cornelia Molnar, Yuan Tian, Zoran Primorac, Andrej Gaćina

Shooting (5) - Snježana Pejčić (10m Air Rifle, 50m Rifle 3 Positions), Giovanni Cernogoraz (Trap), Bojan Đurković (50m Rifle 3 Positions, 50m Rifle Prone, 10m Air Rifle), Anton Glasnović (Trap and Double Trap), Petar Gorša (10m Air Rifle)

Taekwondo (2) - Ana Zaninović (-57kg), Lucija Zaninović (-49kg)

Tennis (2) - Marin Čilić, Ivan Dodig

Croatian National Olympic Water Polo Team (13) - Josip Pavić, Damir Burić, Miho Bošković, Nikša Dobud, Maro Joković, Petar Muslim, Ivan Buljubašić, Andro Bušlje, Sandro Sukno, Samir Barać, Igor Hinić, Paulo Obradović, Frano Vićan

Rowing (5) - Damir Martin, Martin Sinković, Valent Sinković, David Šain (Quadruple Sculls), Mario Vekić (Single Sculls)

Medal winners:

Gold - Sandra Perković (Discus Throw)

Gold - Giovanni Cernogoraz (Trap)

Gold - Croatian National Olympic Water Polo Team

Silver - Quadruple Sculls (Damir Martin, Martin Sinković, Valent Sinković, David Šain),

Bronze - Lucija Zaninović (Taekwondo, -49kg)

Bronze - Croatian National Olympic Handball Team (M)

The Croatian flag was borne by Venio Losert at the Opening and by Damir Martin at the Closing Ceremony.

Winter Olympic Games - Sochi 2014

The XXII Olympic Winter Games were held from February 7 to 23, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

The decision on host city was brought at the IOC’s Session on July 4, 2007 in Guatemala. The other two candidates were Austrian city of Salzburg and South Korean city of PyeongChang.

Sochi Olympics featured a record 88 nations, six more than in Vancouver. Seven nations made their Winter Olympics’ debut - Dominica, Malta, Paraguay, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga and Zimbabwe.

There were 2,873 athletes from 88 countries competing in 15 sports disciplines.

A total of twelve new events were contested, making it the largest Winter Olympics to date. These events were Figure Skating Team Event, Women’s Ski Jumping, Mixed Relay Biathlon, M/W Freeskiing Halfpipe, Team Relay Luge, M/W Freeskiing Slopestyle, M/W Snowboard Slopestyle, M/W Snowboard Parallel Special Slalom. Finally, the IOC announced that three events would be added to the program – Ski Slopestyle, Snowboard Slopestyle and Snowboard Parallel Special Slalom.

Croatian athletes in Sochi - 11

Alpine Skiing (8) - Ivica Kostelić, Natko Zrnčić Dim, Dalibor Šamšal, Matej Vidović, Filip Zubčić, Sebastijan Brigović, Andrea Komšić, Sofija Novoselić

Cross-Country Skiing (2) - Vedrana Malec and Edi Dadić

Women’s Halfpipe (1) - Morena Makar

Medal winners:

Silver - Ivica Kostelić (Alpine Skiing, Super-G)

The Croatian flag was borne by Ivica Kostelić at the Opening and by Vedrana Malec at the Closing Ceremony.

Olympic Games - Rio de Janeiro 2016

Games of the XXXI Olympiad were held from August 5 to 21, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Rio, thus, became the first city in South America to host the Olympic Games.

The decision on selection of Rio de Janeiro as host city was brought at the IOC’s 121. Session in Copenhagen, on November 2, 2009 in the competition with Chicago, Madrid and Tokyo.

There were 11,544 athletes from 205 countries competing in 41 sports disciplines.

Kosovo and South Sudan made their Olympic debut at the Games as well as the Rugby Sevens event, while Gold returned to the program after 112 years.

Croatian athletes in Rio de Janeiro - 88

Athletics (10) - Sandra Perković (Discus Throw), Blanka Vlašić (High Jump), Ana Šimić (High Jump), Andrea Ivančević (100m Hurdles), Ivan Horvat (Pole Vault), Matea Matošević (Marathon), Marija Vrajić (Marathon), Stipe Žunić (Shot Put), Filip Mihaljević (Shot Put), Sara Kolak (Spear)

Cycling (2) - Kristijan Đurasek (Men’s Road Race), Matija Kvasina (Men’s Road Race)

Boxing (2) - Filip Hrgović (Men’s Light Heavyweight, +91 kg), Hrvoje Sep (Men’s Super-Heavyweight, -81 kg)

Weightlifting (1) - Amar Musić (-85 kg)

Gymnastics (2) - Ana Đerek (All-Around), Filip Ude (Pommel Horse)

Wrestling (1) - Božo Starčević (Greco-Roman Style, -75 kg)

Sailing (8) - Šime Fantela (470), Igor Marenić (470), Tina Mihelić (Laser Radial), Tonči Stipanović (Laser), Pavle Kostov (49er), Petar Cupać (49er), Luka Mratović (RS: X), Ivan Kljaković Gašpić (Finn)

Judo (1) - Barbara Matić (-70kg)

Basketball (12) - Marko Arapović, Luka Babić, Miro Bilan, Bojan Bogdanović, Mario Hezonja, Filip Krušlin, Darko Planinić, Krunoslav Simon, Rok Stipčević, Željko Šakić, Dario Šarić, Roko Leni Ukić

Swimming (2) - Matea Samardžić (Women’s 400m Individual Medley, Women’s 100m Backstroke, Women’s 200m Backstroke), Mario Todorović (50m Freestyle)

Handball (14) - Ivan Pešić, Ilija Brozović, Ivan Čupić, Domagoj Duvnjak, Jakov Gojun, Zlatko Horvat, Igor Karačić, Marko Kopljar, Krešimir Kozina, Ivan Slišković, Ivan Stevanović, Luka Stepančić, Manuel Štrlek

Diving (1) - Marcela Marić (Women’s 3m Springboard)

Table Tennis (1) - Andrej Gaćina

Shooting (7) - Snježana Pejčić (Air Rifle 10m, 50m Rifle 3 Positions), Josip Glasnović (Trap), Valentina Gustin (Air Rifle 10m), Petar Gorša (Air Rifle 10m), Giovanni Cernogoraz (Trap), Tanja Perec (Air Rifle 10m- 50m Rifle 3 Positions), Marija Marović (Air Pistol 10m)

Taekwondo (3) - Ana Zaninović (-53 kg), Lucija Zaninović (-49 kg), Flip Grgić (-68 kg)

Tennis (4) - Marin Čilić, Marin Draganja, Borna Ćorić, Ana Konjuh

Water Polo (13) - Marko Bijač, Luka Bukić, Damir Burić, Andro Bušlje, Maro Joković, Luka Lončar, Josip Pavić, Antonio Petković, Anđelo Šetka, Xavier Garcia Gadea, Ivan Krapić, Marko Macan, Sandro Sukno

Rowing (3) - Valent Sinković (Men’s Double Sculls, M 2x), Martin Sinković (Men’s Double Sculls, M 2x), Damir Martin (Men’s Single Sculls, M 1x)

Medal winners:

Gold - Josip Glasnović (Shooting, Trap)

Gold - Sandra Perković (Athletics, Discus Throw)

Gold - Sara Kolak (Athletics, Spear)

Gold - Martin and Valent Sinković (Rowing, Double Sculls)

Gold - Šime Fantela and Igor Marenić (Sailing, Class 470)

Silver - Damir Martin (Rowing, Single Sculls)

Silver - Tonči Stipanović (Sailing, Laser)

Silver - Croatian National Olympic Water Polo Team

Bronze - Blanka Vlašić (Athletics, High Jump)

Bronze - Filip Hrgović (Boxing, Super-Heavyweight, +91 kg)

Croatian Olympians from Paris 1900 Rio de Janeiro 2016

Alphabetical list of all Croatian Olympics from the Olympic Games in Paris in 1900 to the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro 2016.:

A

Alen Abramović (skijaško trčanje)

Nikola Adamović (boks)

Eldijana Aganović (stolni tenis)

Vladan Alanović (košarka)

Josip Alebić (atletika)

Nikša Alegretti (veslanje)

Mirko Alilović (rukomet)

Klement - Mile Alujević (veslanje)

Juraj Amšel (vaterpolo)

Mario Ančić (tenis)

Dragan Andrić (vaterpolo)

Damir Anić (gimnastika)

Andrija Anković (nogomet)

Duško Antunović (vaterpolo)

Marija Anzulović (odbojka)

Mate Arapov (jedrenje)

Franjo Arapović (košarka)

Marko Arapović (košarka)

Ivan Arčanin (plivanje)

Gojko Arneri (plivanje i vaterpolo)

Maida Arslanagić (rukomet)

Damir Atiković (stolni tenis)

 

B

Dragutin Babić (nogomet)

Luka Babić (košarka)

Nikola Babić (nogomet)

Monika Babok (plivanje)

Artur Bajan (veslanje)

Danijel Bajlo (veslanje)

Josip Bajlo (veslanje)

Romano Bajlo (veslanje)

Frano Bakarić (atletika)

Veljko Bakašun (vaterpolo)

Joakim Bakov (atletika)

Andrea Bakula (stolni tenis)

Zdenko Balaš (veslanje)

Ivano Balić (rukomet)

Maro Balić (vaterpolo)

Bernard Ban (hrvanje)

Ćiril Ban (veslanje)

Anton Banek (biciklizam)

Marko Banić (košarka)

Marko Banović (veslanje)

Petra Banović (plivanje)

Samir Barač (vaterpolo)

Stanko Barač (košarka)

Tito Barač (jedrenje)

Ivica Barbarić (nogomet)

Bruno Barbić (plivanje)

Blago Barbieri (plivanje)

Hrvoje Barić (plivanje)

Dragica Basletić (gimnastika)

Karlo Bašić (jedrenje)

Mirko Bašić (rukomet)

Sonja Bašić (rukomet)

Tomislav Bašić (jedrenje)

Karlo Baumann (jedrenje)

Vladimir Beara (nogomet)

Milivoj Bebić (vaterpolo)

Branko Becić (veslanje)

Vera Begić (atletika)

Zdenko Bego (veslanje)

Zvonko Bego (nogomet)

Miljan Begović (umjetničko klizanje)

Branko Belačić (veslanje)

Siniša Belamarić (vaterpolo)

Rudolf Belin (nogomet)

Boris Beljak (veslanje)

Ljubomir Benčić (nogomet)

Milivoj Benković (skijanje)

Antun Bezjak (atletika)

Mislav Bezmalinović (vaterpolo)

Damir Bičanić (rukomet)

Marko Bijač (vaterpolo)

Miro Bilan (košarka)

Cvjetko Bilić (biciklizam)

Nada Birko Kustec (skijanje)

Đurđica Bjedov (plivanje)

Mira Bjedov (košarka)

Milan Blaće (veslanje)

Ana Boban (plivanje)

Stjepan Bobek (nogomet)

Stjepan Bocak (nogomet)

Bojan Bogdanović (košarka)

Stjepan Boltižar (gimnastika)

Ante Bonačić (atletika)

Ante Tonći Bonačić (nogomet)

Duje Bonačić (veslanje)

Filip Bonačić (vaterpolo)

Ozren Bonačić (vaterpolo)

Igor Boraska (veslanje i bob)

Tamara Boroš (stolni tenis)

Alen Bošković (vaterpolo)

Miho Bošković (vaterpolo)

Marko Brajnović (vaterpolo)

Sebastian Brigović (alpsko skijanje)

Ivana Brkljačić (atletika)

Marijan Brnčić (nogomet)

Božo Broketa (nogomet)

Nina Broznić (skijaško trčanje)

Ilija Brozović (rukomet)

Ante Bui (jedrenje)

Tihomir Buinjac (atletika)

Josip Bujas (veslanje)

Leonardo Bujas (veslanje)

Šime Bujas (veslanje)

Luka Bukić (vaterpolo)

Perica Bukić (vaterpolo)

Ivan Bulaja (jedrenje)

Toni Bulaja (jedrenje)

Bruno Bulić (biciklizam)

Jerko Bulić (atletika)

Nenad Buljan (plivanje)

Ivan Buljubašić (vaterpolo)

Denis Buntić (rukomet)

Ivo Buratović (atletika)

Andrej Burić (skijaško trčanje)

Damir Burić (vaterpolo)

Andro Bušlje (vaterpolo)

Alma Butia (atletika)

Milan Butorac (veslanje)

Zlatko Buzina (veslanje)

 

C

Zlatko Celent (veslanje)

Zdravko Ceraj (atletika)

Giovanni Cernogoraz (streljaštvo)

Luka Ciganović (vaterpolo)

Iva Ciglar (košarka)

Suzana Cimbal Špirelja (streljaštvo)

Zvonimir Cimermančić (nogomet)

Luka Cindrić (rukomet)

Slavin Cindrić (nogomet)

Dragutin Ciotti (gimnastika)

Ivica Cipci (vaterpolo)

Tomislav Crnković (nogomet)

Nikica Cukrov (nogomet)

Petar Cupač (jedrenje)

Borislav Cvetković (nogomet)

Ante Cvitković (plivanje)

Danko Cvjetičanin (košarka)

Vinko Cvjetković (vaterpolo)

 

Č

Renata Čabrijan (atletika)

Krešimir Čač (plivanje)

Zlatko Čajkovski (nogomet)

Željko Čajkovski (nogomet)

Ivan Čaklec (gimnastika)

Novica Čanović (atletika)

Patrik Čavar (rukomet)

Jelena Čebukina (odbojka)

Igor Čerenšek (plivanje)

Marin Čilić (tenis)

Tomislav Čižmešija (umjetničko klizanje)

Željka Čižmešija (umjetničko klizanje)

Slobodanka Čolović, (atletika)

Vladimir Čonč (nogomet)

Milan Čop (nogomet)

Josip Čorak (hrvanje)

Karlo Čović (hrvanje)

Krešimir Čuljak (veslanje)

Ivan Čupić (rukomet)

Nikola Čupin (veslanje)

Milivoj Čurlica (vaterpolo)

Zoran Čutura (košarka)

 

Ć

Borna Ćorić (tenis)

Krešimir Ćosić (košarka)

Josip Ćuk (streljaštvo)

 

D

Dejan Dabović (vaterpolo)

Edi Dadić (skijaško trčanje)

Stipe Damjanović (hrvanje)

Tinka Dančević (plivanje)

Patricia Daničić (odbojka)

Eugen Dasović (nogomet)

Zmaj Defilipis (plivanje)

Mario Delač (plivanje)

Aleksej Demjanov (gimnastika)

Ivo Despot (veslanje)

Stanko Despot (veslanje)

Stjepan Deverić (nogomet)

Slobodan Dijaković (plivanje)

Zdravko Divjak (plivanje)

Nikša Dobud (vaterpolo)

Ivan Dodig (tenis)

Davor Dominiković (rukomet)

Mihovil Dorčić (plivanje)

Duje Draganja (plivanje)

Marin Draganja (tenis)

Marko Dragičević (veslanje)

Niki Drpić (bob)

Stipe Drviš (boks)

Artur Dubravčić (nogomet)

Miroslav Dubravčić (veslanje)

Sanda Dubravčić (umjetničko klizanje)

Đuro Dukanović (biciklizam)

Darko Dukić (boks)

Domagoj Duvnjak (rukomet)

 

Mirza Džomba (rukomet)

 

Đ

Ana Đerek (gimnastika)

Vedran Đipalo (boks)

Teo Đogaš (vaterpolo)

Jovan Đolić (kajak-kanu)

Veselin Đuho (vaterpolo)

Kristijan Đurasek (biciklizam)

Bojan Đurković (streljaštvo)

Zorica Đurković (košarka)

 

E

Kristina Elez (rukomet)

Edis Elkasević (atletika)

Tina Erceg (gimnastika)

Stevimir Ercegovac (atletika)

Siniša Ergotić (atletika)

 

F

Aleksandar Fabijanić (veslanje)

Minski Fabris (jedrenje)

Mario Fafangel (jedrenje)

Jakov Fak (biatlon)

Bruno Faninger (biciklizam)

Šime Fantela (jedrenje)

Nediljko Farčić (atletika)

Vid Fašaić (veslanje)

Elvis Fatović (vaterpolo)

Jasna Fazlić (stolni tenis)

Matea Ferk (alpsko skijanje)

Peroslav Ferković (atletika)

Miet Filipović (taekwondo)

Vladimir Firm (nogomet)

Antun Fischer (hrvanje)

Hrvoje Fižuleto (atletika)

Nika Fleiss (alpsko skijanje)

Đurđa Fočić (atletika)

Igor Francetić (veslanje)

Jasminka Francki (streljaštvo)

Lovrenco Franičević (plivanje)

Nikola Franković (vaterpolo)

Tihomir Franković (veslanje)

Valner Franković (rukomet)

Radojka Franzotti (atletika)

Tomislav Franjković (vaterpolo)

Dragutin Friedrich (nogomet)

Vladimir Fumić (biciklizam)

Dražen Funtak (kajak-kanu)

Dušan Furlan (gimnastika)

 

G

Andrej Gačina (stolni tenis)

Anita Gaće (rukomet)

Anita Galić (plivanje)

Dominik Galić (plivanje)

Rudolf Galin (atletika)

Žarko Galjanić (biatlon)

Xavier Garcia (vaterpolo)

Đuro Gašpar (atletika)

Renato Gašpar (alpsko skijanje)

Zdenka Gašparac (plivanje)

Sanja Gavrilović (atletika)

Tonko Gazzari (plivanje)

Giuseppe Giergia (košarka)

Franjo Giller (nogomet)

Ivo Giovanelli (vaterpolo)

Anton Glasnović (streljaštvo)

Josip Glasnović (streljaštvo)

Damir Glavan (vaterpolo)

Biljana Gligorović (odbojka)

Andrej Glucks (kajak-kanu)

Petar Goić (atletika)

Miroslav Gojanović (hokej na ledu)

Jakov Gojun (rukomet)

Sabrina Goleš (tenis)

Slavko Goluža (rukomet)

Petar Gorša (streljaštvo)

Jurica Grabušić (atletika i bob)

Zdravko Gracin (veslanje)

Nenad Gračan (nogomet)

Ivan Granec (nogomet)

Janez Grbelja (veslanje)

Nikola Grbić (hrvanje)

Anton Grego (jedrenje)

Bojan Grego (jedrenje)

Alen Gregov (košarka)

Filip Grgić (taekwondo)

Božo Grkinić (vaterpolo)

Jelena Grubišić (rukomet)

Špiro Grubišić (veslanje)

Ante Guberina (veslanje)

Ivan Gubijan (atletika)

Bruno Gudelj (rukomet)

Ivan Gudelj (nogomet)

Valentina Gustin (streljaštvo)

 

H

Nino Habun (atletika)

Andras Haklits (atletika i bob)

Erna Hawelka (gimnastika)

Zdravko Hebel (vaterpolo)

Idora Hegel (umjetničko klizanje)

Danko Herceg (kajak-kanu)

Leopold Herenčić (dizanje utega)

Mario Hezonja (košarka)

Igor Hinić (vaterpolo)

Saša Hiršzon (tenis)

Ivan Hmjelovjec (gimnastika)

Hrvoje Horvat (rukomet)

Ivan Horvat (atletika)

Ivica Horvat (nogomet)

Lidija Horvat (rukomet)

Nikolina Horvat (atletika)

Vladimir Horvat (veslanje)

Zlatko Horvat (rukomet)

Emanuel Horvatiček (kajak-kanu)

Marko Horvatin (veslanje)

Filip Hrgović (boks)

Miloš Hrstić (nogomet)

Zdravko Huljev (veslanje)

Dragutin Husjak (veslanje)

 

I

Katica Ileš (rukomet)

Vanja Ilić (plivanje)

Saša Imprić (plivanje)

Andrea Ivančević (atletika)

Mirko Ivančić (veslanje)

Ivo Ivaniš (vaterpolo)

Goran Ivanišević (tenis)

Anton Ivanković (veslanje)

Luca Ivanković (košarka)

Ivan Ivanović (atletika)

Jelena Ivezić (košarka)

Filip Ivić (rukomet)

Dragutin Karlo Ivković (biciklizam)

Tomislav Ivković (nogomet)

Vladimir Ivković (vaterpolo)

 

J

Marko Jakopović (atletika)

Franjo Jakovac (biatlon)

Ivana Jakupčević (umjetničko klizanje)

Milan Janić (kajak-kanu)

Stjepan Janić (kajak-kanu)

Slavko Janjušević (veslanje)

Boris Jarak (rukomet)

Tihomir Jarnjević (veslanje)

Ivan Jazbinšek (nogomet)

Milan Jeger (plivanje)

Davor Jelaska (veslanje)

Anđa Jelavić (košarka)

Ivana Jelčić (rukomet)

Vladimir Jelčić (rukomet)

Barbara Jelić (odbojka)

Dragutin Jelić (gimnastika)

Ivan Jelić (gimnastika)

Ivica Jelić (odbojka)

Vesna Jelić (odbojka)

Vinko Jelovac (košarka)

Ana Jelušić (alpsko skijanje)

Vinka Jeričević (plivanje)

Željko Jerkov (košarka)

Zdravko Ježić (vaterpolo)

Maro Joković (vaterpolo)

Bojan Jovanović (mačevanje)

Sanja Jovanović (plivanje)

Dijana Jovetić (rukomet)

Božidar Jović (rukomet)

Ivan Jukić (veslanje)

Gordana Jurcan (odbojka)

Viktor Jurčec (biciklizam)

Damir Jurčević (skijaško trčanje)

Darko Juričić (atletika)

Dragan Jurilj (taekwondo)

Pavle Jurina (rukomet)

Vice Jurišić (veslanje)

Franjo Jurjević (gimnastika)

 

K

Ratko Kacian (nogomet)

Hrvoje Kačić (vaterpolo)

Zoran Kačić (vaterpolo)

Nikša Kaleb (rukomet)

Zoran Kalebić (jedrenje)

Branko Kallay (atletika)

Marijan Kanjer (plivanje)

Igor Karačić (rukomet)

Lisa Ann Karčić (košarka)

Tomislav Karlo (plivanje)

Ivo Karlović (tenis)

Mladen Kašić (odbojka)

Ana Kaštelan (odbojka)

Frane Kazija (veslanje)

Maja Kezele (skijaško trčanje)

Ivica Klaić (taekwondo)

Nikola Kleut (atletika)

Lucijan Kleva (veslanje)

Denis Klobučar (skijaško trčanje)

Nenad Kljaić (rukomet)

Ivan Kljaković – Gašpić (jedrenje)

Željko Knapić (atletika)

Andro Knego (košarka)

Tanja Kober (gimnastika)

Vjekoslav Kobeščak (vaterpolo)

Petar Milan Kokotović (hrvanje)

Sara Kolak (atletika)

Nataša Kolega (rukomet)

Slavko Koletić (hrvanje)

Đulijano Koludra (bob)

Arijan Komazec (košarka)

Andrea Komšić (alpsko skijanje)

Ana Konjuh (tenis)

Marko Kopljar (rukomet)

Danijel Korica (atletika)

Nikola Korica (bob)

Jelena Kostanić (tenis)

Ivica Kostelić (alpsko skijanje)

Janica Kostelić (alpsko skijanje)

Pavle Kostov (jedrenje)

Mladen Koščak (nogomet)

Đani Kovač (atletika)

Aleksandar Kovačević (atletika)

Dragutin Kovačić (košarka)

Zdravko Kovačić (vaterpolo)

Krešimir Kozina (rukomet)

Aleksandar Kozlina (nogomet)

Filip Kozulić (veslanje)

Gordan Kožulj (plivanje)

Slaven Krajačić (atletika i bob)

Franjo Krajcar (atletika)

Branko Kralj (nogomet)

Ivan Krapić (vaterpolo)

Joško Kreković (vaterpolo)

Tomislav Krizmanić (boks)

Miran Krmelj (hokej na ledu)

Ante Krnčević (veslanje)

Daniel Krnčević (veslanje)

Stipe Krnčević (veslanje)

Antun Kropivšek (gimnastika)

Mišo Krstičević (nogomet)

Duje Krstulović (košarka)

Filip Krušlin (košarka)

Zvonimir Krznarić (kajak-kanu)

Ognjen Kržić (vaterpolo)

Toni Kukoč (košarka)

Aljoša Kunac (vaterpolo)

Ivan Kuret (jedrenje)

Karlo Kuret (jedrenje)

Ivan Kurtini (vaterpolo)

Davor Kus (košarka)

Ante Kušurin (veslanje)

Matija Kvasina (biciklizam)

Kornelija Kvesić (košarka)

 

L

Jakov Labura (veslanje)

Blaženko Lacković (rukomet)

Đorđe Lavrnić (rukomet)

Ana Lelas (košarka)

Žana Lelas (košarka)

Nataša Leto (odbojka)

Ivan Levačić (biciklizam)

Ivo Lipanović (veslanje)

Luka Lipošinović (nogomet)

Vlado Lisjak (hrvanje)

Thomas Lodler (alpsko skijanje)

Alen Lončar (plivanje)

Krešimir Lončar (košarka)

Luka Lončar (vaterpolo)

Ronald Lopatny (vaterpolo)

Venio Losert (rukomet)

Joža Lovec (veslanje)

Boris Lovrić (bob)

Ivana Lovrić (rukomet)

Dan Lovrović (jedrenje)

Marin Lovrović (jedrenje)

Boško Lozica (vaterpolo)

Deni Lušić (vaterpolo)

Slavko Luštica (nogomet)

 

LJ

Matija Ljubek (kajak-kanu)

Nikica Ljubek (kajak-kanu)

Ivan Ljubičić (tenis)

Pavao Ljubičić (veslanje)

Stjepan Ljubić (biciklizam)

 

M

Marko Macan (vaterpolo)

Stevo Macura (veslanje)

Ede Mađar (gimnastika)

Iva Majoli (tenis)

Morena Makar (snowboard)

Vedrana Malec (skijaško trčanje)

Mladenka Malenica (streljaštvo)

Marko Mamić (rukomet)

Danko Mandić (jedrenje)

Marko Mandić (veslanje)

Sandra Mandir (košarka)

Predrag Manojlović (vaterpolo)

Davor Marcelić (košarka)

Davorin Marčelja (atletika)

Nikola Mardešić (veslanje)

Igor Marenić (jedrenje)

Igor Marić (bob)

Marcela Marić (skokovi u vodu)

Martin Marić (atletika)

Tomislav Marijanović (judo)

Danko Marinelli (alpsko skijanje)

Boško Marinko (hrvanje)

Smiljana Marinović (plivanje)

Ivan Marjanović (nogomet)

Pavo Marković (vaterpolo)

Marcel Markulin (gimnastika)

Rudolf Markušić (atletika)

Zoran Maroević (košarka)

Dejan Marović (boks)

Marija Marović (streljaštvo)

Pavao Martić (veslanje)

Petra Martić (tenis)

Damir Martin (veslanje)

Oliver Martinov (veslanje)

Sead Marušić (veslanje)

Zlatko Mašek (streljaštvo)

Ante Mašković (plivanje)

Dubravko Mataković (kajak-kanu)

Ladislav Matetić (veslanje)

Barbara Matić (judo)

Zoran Matković (streličarstvo)

Matea Matošević (atletika)

Valter Matošević (rukomet)

Frane Matošić (nogomet)

Drago Matulaj (veslanje)

Jerko Matulić (rukomet)

Željko Matuš (nogomet)

Željko Mavrović (boks)

Mirna Mazić (košarka)

Vladimir Mažuranić (mačevanje)

Vilim Messner (atletika)

Petar Metličić (rukomet)

Miroslav Metzner - Fritz (hrvanje)

Mate Mezulić (bob)

Svetlana Micić (rukomet)

Franjo Mihalić (atletika)

Filip Mihaljević (atletika)

Maksimilijan Mihelčić (nogomet)

Tina Mihelić (jedrenje)

Vladimir Miholjević (biciklizam)

Miro Mihovilović (vaterpolo)

Zlata Mijatović (gimnastika)

Sebastijan Miknić (jedrenje)

Siniša Mikuličić (jedrenje)

Zoran Mikulić (rukomet)

Vesna Milanović Litre (rukomet)

Vladimir Milić (atletika)

Petar Milin (veslanje)

Nenad Miloš (plivanje)

Petar Miloš (boks)

Predrag Miloš (plivanje)

Stanko Miloš (veslanje)

Miloš Milošević (plivanje)

Zdravko Miljak (rukomet)

Branko Miljuš (nogomet)

Marijana Mišković (judo)

Antonija Mišura (košarka)

Marko Mišura (jedrenje)

Ivan Mladina (plivanje)

Drago Mlinarec (hokej na ledu)

Mate Mojtić (veslanje)

Cornelia Molnar Vajda (stolni tenis)

Luka Mratović (jedrenje)

Duško Mrduljaš (veslanje)

Emanuel Mrduljaš (veslanje)

Veljko Mršić (košarka)

Emir Mujčinović (kajak-kanu)

Nedžad Mulabegović (atletika)

Damir Mulaomerović (košarka)

Dinko Mulić (kajak-kanu)

Maja Murić (tenis)

Amar Musić (dizanje utega)

Petar Muslim (vaterpolo)

Dragan Mustapić (atletika)

Ivan Mustapić (atletika)

Zoran Mustur (vaterpolo)

 

N

Alvaro Načinović (rukomet)

Aramis Naglić (košarka)

Danira Nakić (košarka)

Mihovil Nakić (košarka)

Veljko Narančić (atletika)

Antun Nardelli (vaterpolo)

Vjera Neferović (atletika)

Vladimir Nekora (veslanje)

Milovan Nenadić (hrvanje)

Milan Neralić (mačevanje)

Sandro Nicević (košarka)

Simo Nikolić (jedrenje)

Vera Nikolić (atletika)

Nikola Nimac (skeleton)

Željko Nimš (rukomet)

Enia Ninčević (jedrenje)

Ivan Ninčević (rukomet)

Mladen Ninić (veslanje)

Frane Nonković (vaterpolo)

Sofija Novoselić (alpsko skijanje)

 

O

Paulo Obradović (vaterpolo)

Stjepan Obran (rukomet)

Mirjana Ognjenović (rukomet)

Ivan Olivari (alpsko skijanje)

Vjekoslav Oršolić (atletika)

Alek Osmanović (bob)

Andrija Otenheimer (atletika)

Petar Ozretić (veslanje)

Sanja Ožegović (košarka)

 

P

Tea Palić (alpsko skijanje)

Franjo Palković (hrvanje)

Miroslav Pandaković (skijanje)

Sandra Paović (stolni tenis)

Zlatko Papec (nogomet)

Mate Parlov (boks)

Tomislav Paškvalin (vaterpolo)

Ivan Pavelić (plivanje)

Vazmoslav Pavešić (vaterpolo)

Vojko Pavičić (vaterpolo)

Josip Pavić (vaterpolo)

Vedran Pavlek (alpsko skijanje)

Antun Pavleković (nogomet)

Karlo Pavlenč (veslanje)

Jelica Pavličić (atletika)

Kim Daniela Pavlin (plivanje)

Alfons Pažur (nogomet)

Snježana Pejčić (streljaštvo)

Andrea Penezić (rukomet)

Velimir Perasović (košarka)

Rudolf Percl (nogomet)

Tanja Perec (streljaštvo)

Stjepan Perestegi (kajak-kanu)

Kristina Perica (atletika)

Marko Perinović (veslanje)

Vanja Perišić (atletika)

Goran Perkovac (rukomet)

Dražen Perković (taekwondo)

Sandra Perković (atletika)

Elvis Peršić (atletika)

Emil Perška (nogomet)

Željko Perušić (nogomet)

Nikolaj Pešalov (dizanje utega)

Dušan Pešić (nogomet)

Ivan Pešić (rukomet)

Antonio Petković (vaterpolo)

Anamarija Petričević (plivanje)

Zvonimir Petričević (košarka)

Silvijo Petriško (veslanje)

Mateja Petronijević (jedrenje)

Dragutin Petrovečki (veslanje)

Aleksandar Petrović (košarka)

Alojz Petrović (gimnastika)

Biljana Petrović (atletika)

Dražen Petrović (košarka)

Janez Pintar (veslanje)

Pavao Pintarić (mačevanje)

Ante Pivčević (jedrenje)

Darko Planinić (košarka)

Zoran Planinić (košarka)

Eugen Plazzeriano (nogomet)

Nikola Plečaš (košarka)

Eugen Pleško (biciklizam)

Josip Pokupec (biciklizam)

Damir Polić (vaterpolo)

Miroslav Poljak (vaterpolo)

Edi Ponoš (atletika)

Marko Popović (košarka)

Milan Poredski (biciklizam)

Renco Posinković (vaterpolo)

Vlado Poslek (kajak-kanu)

Adolf Potokar (veslanje)

Stjepan Prauhardt (streljaštvo)

Boris Praunsperger (plivanje)

Franjo–Luka Predanić (atletika)

Danijel Premerl (nogomet)

Danijel Premuš (vaterpolo)

Miroslav Pribanić (rukomet)

Boro Primorac (nogomet)

Zoran Primorac (stolni tenis)

Nikola Prkačin (košarka)

August Prosenik (biciklizam)

Goran Prpić (tenis)

Darko Prvan (plivanje)

Jasna Ptujec (rukomet)

Iztok Puc (rukomet)

Josef Puch (konjički sport)

Ivan Pudar (nogomet)

Ivan Puhar (plivanje)

Goran Puljko (veslanje)

Aleksej Puninski (plivanje)

Nikica Pušić–Koroljević (rukomet)

Mirko Puzović (boks)

 

R

Krešimir Račić (atletika)

Antonio Rački (skijaško trčanje)

Luka Radelić (jedrenje)

Željko Radić (vaterpolo)

Igor Radin (veslanje)

Lovro Radonić (plivanje i vaterpolo)

Jadran Radovčić (veslanje)

Milivoj Radović (mačevanje)

Nikola Radović (nogomet)

Dino Rađa (košarka)

Boris Rađenović (bob)

Ivan Ratej (hokej na ledu)

Ivan Ratkić (alpsko skijanje)

Ronald Ređep (stolni tenis)

Josip Reić (veslanje)

Boris Renaud (hokej na ledu)

Marijana Ribičić (odbojka)

Beti Rimac (odbojka)

Slaven Rimac (košarka)

Slavica Rinčić (rukomet)

Janko Rodin (nogomet)

Radoslav Rogina (biciklizam)

Veljko Rogošić (plivanje)

Vanja Rogulj (plivanje)

Ante Roje (plivanje i vaterpolo)

Zoran Roje (vaterpolo)

Nikša Roki (plivanje)

Vera Romanić (atletika)

Vinko Rosić (vaterpolo)

Marin Rozić (košarka)

Giansandro Rudan (plivanje)

Damjan Rudež (košarka)

Ratko Rudić (vaterpolo)

Vatroslav Rupčić (boks)

Rudolf Rupec (nogomet)

Siniša Rutešić (veslanje)

 

S

Zvonimir Sabolović (atletika)

Emanuela Salopek (košarka)

Matea Samardžić (plivanje)

Zlatko Saračević (rukomet)

Ninoslav Saraga (veslanje)

Predrag Sarić (veslanje)

Višeslav Sarić (vaterpolo)

Milovan Savić (atletika)

Đuro Savinović (vaterpolo)

Josip Scholz (nogomet)

Dobrivoje Selec (rukomet)

Hrvoje Sep (boks)

Zvonimir Serdarušić (rukomet)

Krunoslav Simon (košarka)

Martin Sinković (veslanje)

Valent Sinković (veslanje)

Ingrid Siscovich (odbojka)

Vjekoslav Skalak (veslanje)

Petar Skansi (košarka)

Nikša Skelin (veslanje)

Siniša Skelin (veslanje)

Mirela Skoko (streljaštvo)

Suzana Skoko (streljaštvo)

Branko Skroče (košarka)

Zoran Slavnić (košarka)

Iva Slišković (košarka)

Ivan Slišković (rukomet)

Irfan Smajlagić (rukomet)

Mile Smodlaka (vaterpolo)

Vladimir Smokvina (plivanje)

Tomislav Smoljanović (veslanje)

Koloman Sović (biciklizam)

Aleksa Spahić (atletika)

Obrad Sretenović (boks)

Božo Starčević (hrvanje)

Petra Starčević (biatlon)

Zulejka Stefanini (atletika)

Luka Stepančić (rukomet)

Ivan Stevanović (rukomet)

Nikola Stipaničev (veslanje)

Andrijana Stipaničić Mrvelj (biatlon)

Karlo Stipanić (vaterpolo)

Tonći Stipanović (jedrenje)

Rok Stipčević (košarka)

Marijan Stipetić (plivanje)

Dominik Straga (plivanje)

Marko Strahija (plivanje)

Antun Strain (biciklizam)

Aleksandar Strmac (vaterpolo)

Lisa Christina Stublić (atletika)

Goran Sukno (vaterpolo)

Sandro Sukno (vaterpolo)

Renato Sulić (rukomet)

Ivan Sunara (košarka)

Rade Sunara (veslanje)

Luciano Sušanj (atletika)

 

Š

Ivan Šabjan (kajak-kanu)

David Šain (veslanje)

Željko Šakić (košarka)

Dalibor Šamšal (alpsko skijanje)

Ivan Šantek (nogomet)

Dario Šarić (košarka)

Sandra Šarić (taekwondo)

Renata Šašak (tenis)

Petar Šegedin (atletika)

Mirjana Šegrt (plivanje)

Petar Šegvić (veslanje)

Jasna Šekarić (streljaštvo)

Vojko Šeravić (veslanje)

Andrea Šerić (rukomet)

Tomislav Šestak (hrvanje)

Anđelo Šetka (vaterpolo)

Jaroslav Šifer (nogomet)

Dubravko Šimenc (vaterpolo)

Zlatko Šimenc (vaterpolo)

Ana Šimić (atletika)

Davorin Šindler (veslanje)

Tin Široki (alpsko skijanje)

Karla Šitić (daljinsko plivanje)

Marijo Šivolija – Jelica (boks)

Boris Škanata (plivanje)

Paško Škarica (veslanje)

Damir Škaro (boks)

Siniša Školneković (vaterpolo)

Zlatko Škorić (nogomet)

Josip Škrabl (biciklizam)

Franjo Škrinjar (atletika)

Viktor Šnajder (atletika)

Ivan Šola (bob)

Vlado Šola (rukomet)

Damir Šolman (košarka)

Franjo Šoštarić (nogomet)

Kazimir Šoštarko (biciklizam)

Roman Špirelja (streljaštvo)

Denis Špoljarić (rukomet)

Goran Šprem (rukomet)

Karolina Šprem (tenis)

Ivo Štakula (vaterpolo)

Srećko Štiglić (atletika)

Drago Štritof (atletika)

Ratko Štritof (vaterpolo)

Manuel Štrlek (rukomet)

Vladimir Šujster (rukomet)

Davor Šuker (nogomet)

Dragutin Šurbek (stolni tenis)

Marijana Šurković (plivanje)

 

T

Žan Tabak (košarka)

Silvija Talaja (tenis)

Mirko Tarana (vaterpolo)

Miranda Tatari (rukomet)

Ivan Telesmanić (veslanje)

Hrvoje Telišman (veslanje)

Yuan Tian (stolni tenis)

Jakov Tironi (veslanje)

Ana Titlić (rukomet)

Mario Todorović (plivanje)

Marko Tomas (košarka)

Sandro Tomas (plivanje)

Marko Tomasović (boks)

Robert Tomašević (taekwondo)

Bogdan Tošović (vaterpolo)

Karlo Toth (hrvanje)

Ljubomir Travica (odbojka)

Branimir Tretinjak (mačevanje)

Krešimir Tretinjak (mačevanje)

Slobodan Trifunović (vaterpolo)

Anja Trišić (plivanje)

Mate Trojanović (veslanje)

Nikola Trojanović (plivanje)

Rudolf Milan Truban (biciklizam)

Ivo Trumbić (vaterpolo)

Ratomir Tvrdić (košarka)

 

U

Filip Ude (gimnastika)

Gabrijela Ujčić (plivanje)

Roko Leni Ukić (košarka)

Marija Uzelac (košarka)

 

V

Željko Vađić (streljaštvo)

Nevio Valčić (biciklizam)

Tonči Valčić (rukomet)

Velimir Valenta (veslanje)

Dario Varga (veslanje)

Roland Robert Varga (atletika)

Tino Vegar (vaterpolo)

Mario Vekić (veslanje)

Atilio Venturini (plivanje)

Maja Veršec (gimnastika)

Luko Vezilić (vaterpolo)

Nataša Vezmar (taekwondo)

Frano Vićan (vaterpolo)

Dario Vidošević (veslanje)

Joško Vidošević (nogomet)

Albin Vidović (rukomet)

Branko Vidović (plivanje)

Matej Vidović (alpsko skijanje)

Mirko Vincens (kajak-kanu)

Vladimir Vinek (nogomet)

Biserka Višnjić (rukomet)

Blanka Vlašić (atletika)

Perica Vlašić (veslanje)

Blaženka Vodenlić (skijanje)

Dejan Vojnović (atletika i bob)

Goran Volarević (vaterpolo)

Igor Vori (rukomet)

Dragutin Vragović (nogomet)

Marija Vrajić (atletika)

Josip Vranković (košarka)

Stojko Vranković (košarka)

Tihomil Vranješ (vaterpolo)

Stjepan Vrbančić (nogomet)

Biserka Vrbek (streljaštvo)

Renato Vrbičić (vaterpolo)

Ante Vrčić (veslanje)

Zdeslav Vrdoljak (vaterpolo)

Dragutin Vrđuka (nogomet)

Marija Vrsaljko (košarka)

Miroslav Vučetić (plivanje)

Damir Vučičić (veslanje)

Branimir Vujević (veslanje)

Vojislav Vujević (judo)

Zlatko Vujović (nogomet)

Zoran Vujović (nogomet)

Rudolf Vuk (streljaštvo)

Bernard Vukas (nogomet)

Branko Vukičević (košarka)

Ljubo Vukić (rukomet)

Siniša Vukonić (skijaško trčanje)

Drago Vuković (rukomet)

Boško Vuksanović (vaterpolo)

Dubravka Vukušić (brzo klizanje)

Božo Vuletić (vaterpolo)

 

W

Hermann Weiland (konjički sport)

Franjo Wölfl (nogomet)

Rui Wu Tan (stolni tenis)

 

Z

Slaven Zambata (nogomet)

Ana Zaninović (taekwondo)

Lucija Zaninović (taekwondo)

Marijan Zaninović (veslanje)

Branko Zebec (nogomet)

Maja Zebić (rukomet)

Darko Zibar (veslanje)

Josip Zidarn (kajak-kanu)

Branko Zinaja (nogomet)

Dušan Zinaja (skijanje)

Filip Zoričić (jedrenje)

Branko Zorko (atletika)

Zdenko Zorko (rukomet)

Zdravko Zovko (rukomet)

Natko Zrnčić Dim (alpsko skijanje)

Vedran Zrnić (rukomet)

Filip Zubčić (alpsko skijanje)

Martina Zubčić (taekwondo)

 

Ž

Ante Žanetić (nogomet)

Nenad Žugaj (hrvanje)

Neven Žugaj (hrvanje)

Stipe Žunić (atletika)

Romana Župan (jedrenje)

Vjekoslav Župančić (nogomet)

Goran Žuvela (judo)

Marijan Žužej (vaterpolo)

Nenad Žvanut (brzo klizanje)

* (popis obuhvaća sve sportaše-olimpijce koji su izborili nastup na olimpijskim igrama a koji su rođeni na području Hrvatske i one koji su nastup na olimpijskim igrama izborili nastupajući za hrvatske klubove za prethodnih država te sve hrvatske olimpijce od samostalnosti Republike Hrvatske zaključno s OI u Rio de Janeiru 2016.)

 

Hrvatski umjetnici i arhitekti – sudionici olimpijskih igara

(kategorija umjetničkog djela na programu olimpijskih igara bila je od 4. Olimpijskog kongresa u Parizu 1906. do Olimpijskih igara u Londonu 1948. godine)

 

Dragan Boltar (arhitekt i urbanist)

Frane Cota (kipar i arhitekt)

Eugen Erlih (konstruktor)

Franjo Neidhardt (arhitekt)

Kosta Petrović (arhitekt i građevinski inženjer)

Juraj Škarpa (kipar)

Vladimir Turina (arhitekt)

 

 

(izvor podataka: Jurica Gizdić, Hrvatski olimpijci i odličnici, Hrvatski olimpijski odbor, Zagreb, 2016.) (Foto: HINA/Damir Senčar)